Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: OM-03 dull?  (Read 4875 times)
gouzos
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 37




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2008, 02:05:28 AM »

Well, the examples are too many to list, but recently I heard this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFuL6_G-2bA&eurl=http://www.candyrat.com/guitars/StonebridgeModelOMS32SMSN26396/

which has that crispness I'm talking about.

Is that just fresh strings???

Logged

Larrivee OM-03
Larrivee satin Parlor
jeremy3220
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4598




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2008, 03:24:42 AM »

well that's fingerpicked not flatpicked but I'd be willing to bet that guitar has lighter bracing than a Larrivee OM. I honestly think it's your guitar, my OM-03MT is pretty dull for flatpicking on the bass strings. I can hear the thick chunky sound caused by having to move all that wood.
Logged

bearsville0
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1749




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: January 19, 2008, 03:44:26 AM »

Like I said, what do you expect from a $700 guitar? That Stonebridge in the youtube video sells for two grand.


http://candyrat.com/guitars/StonebridgeModelOMS32SMSN26396/
Logged

If it sounds good, it is good.

gouzos
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 37




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: January 19, 2008, 02:31:05 PM »

Sorry, bearsville0 but I can't agree with you at all.

I can accept that it's part of the Larrivee sound or that it's just the sound of my guitar.
I can't accept that an $800 meticulously crafted all-wood guitar is not good enough.
Besides, actually the Stonebridge would sell for about the same street price. The slight difference would probably be just for the extra bling.

Also, there are a number of Larrivee examples I could give you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unAMoGMP88M is also what I'm talking about
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mm53vOTbAVY&feature=related is obviously VERY new strings
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJylLKe9ng0 has a nice sound, but what I consider very typical of a dread
Justin King, underneath all that tapping, slapping and harmonics has a very nice crisp sound

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Et9Dl3ouFk and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0xdGAhQ6TM&feature=related both have a nice tone; more like what I actually get from my guitar

I should also mention my own parlor.

So no, it is not that you can't get a sound like what I'm talking about out of a Larrivee.
Logged

Larrivee OM-03
Larrivee satin Parlor
bearsville0
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1749




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: January 20, 2008, 01:57:53 AM »

I have the same "complaint" about my L-03 walnut. The bass e-string is not as lively as the other strings except when it is brand new, It quickly turns to a muted sound after a week. I had the local luthier look at it (he's an excellent concert classical guitar builder and makes first rate steel string guitars for many well-known players)  and he took off a little from the braces to open up the bass which did help but you can only do so much.

Logged

If it sounds good, it is good.

jeremy3220
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4598




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: January 20, 2008, 02:41:33 AM »

I have the same "complaint" about my L-03 walnut. The bass e-string is not as lively as the other strings except when it is brand new, It quickly turns to a muted sound after a week.


Do you use PB strings? even with bluegrass guage, when I use PB's on the OM-03 my low E disappears.
Logged

bearsville0
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1749




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: January 20, 2008, 04:05:07 AM »

Do you use PB strings? even with bluegrass guage, when I use PB's on the OM-03 my low E disappears.

Right now I have Clapton's choice lights on (PBs).  Before that I had Pearse Silks (also PBs) and the same dulling after a few days despite sounding perfect at first.

I'll try anything you recommend next.

Logged

If it sounds good, it is good.

flatlander
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3804




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: January 20, 2008, 06:04:32 AM »

If you're looking for crisper clear sound, ditch the coated strings!
Logged

10-1614 more than a number, it's body and soul.
jeremy3220
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4598




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: January 20, 2008, 07:11:17 AM »

Right now I have Clapton's choice lights on (PBs).  Before that I had Pearse Silks (also PBs) and the same dulling after a few days despite sounding perfect at first.

I'll try anything you recommend next.



I can't promise they will stay 'bright' but the low E shouldn't sound muted, I think you should try some regular Martin 80/20's or the Martin SP 80/20's. 80/20's have always sounded more bassy to me and if you prefer lights the Martin's have a .054 low E as opposed to the .053 alot of manufactures' use.
Logged

bearsville0
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1749




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: January 20, 2008, 01:25:16 PM »

I can't promise they will stay 'bright' but the low E shouldn't sound muted, I think you should try some regular Martin 80/20's or the Martin SP 80/20's. 80/20's have always sounded more bassy to me and if you prefer lights the Martin's have a .054 low E as opposed to the .053 alot of manufactures' use.

Thanks, the next set I have ready to go is the Martin regulars "custom lights" although the e string is only .052.  I'm going to get a bunch of just e-strings .054 and change them out every week

I had really reconciled myself to thinking that is just one weak point for the guitar  that I can live with till I upgrade by a K or so. I'm not thrilled with changing the strings every week.

BTW, one of my favorite guitar sounds is the Guild dread John Renbourn used to play. Love that floating bass.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beG3WJj6iZc


cheers
Logged

If it sounds good, it is good.

outdoorgb
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 68




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: January 22, 2008, 03:38:47 PM »


BTW, one of my favorite guitar sounds is the Guild dread John Renbourn used to play. Love that floating bass.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beG3WJj6iZc
WOW - cool stuff.


cheers
Logged

Be Prepared...
knowspicker
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 104




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: February 05, 2008, 10:29:12 PM »

I just got a bone saddle from http://larriveewearables.com and that livened up my OM-03... I thought it was find before but sounds fulller and has more dynamic range or depth or something now. Mostly it brings out the treble a little more even on the bass strings if that makes sense.

If you don't already have a bone saddle you might want to try one. They are a cheap and easy improvements that seems to make a big difference in tone, at least to my ears.
Logged
PortHueneme
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 829




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: February 05, 2008, 11:17:32 PM »

I have an OM-03 and I find it very crisp. I have been using D'addario EXP's since it was new, either bluegrass or mediums and they both seem to sound good for the whole life of the string 3-4 months. It is KOA so it might be a different than a hog.
I was wondering though if you had an undersaddle transducer, maybe something is seated properly.
If you have not put in a bone saddle, I agree with others who suggested it, mine came with one and upgraded pins.

Logged

SD-60 SBT
O-50 TSB
OM-03 Koa
D-09 12 string
Gibson-J50
Gibson Blues King
A gaggle of ukes
jeremy3220
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4598




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: February 05, 2008, 11:55:49 PM »

I just got a bone saddle from http://larriveewearables.com and that livened up my OM-03... I thought it was find before but sounds fulller and has more dynamic range or depth or something now. Mostly it brings out the treble a little more even on the bass strings if that makes sense.


Yes it does, it's strange sometimes to hear guitar players talk about EQ/balance/etc. They often aren't able to differentiate between the EQ of the guitar and the loudness of each string, as if the low strings only produce low frequencies. You are certainly right in that it's possible to increase the treble produced from the 'bass' strings.

Logged

bluesman67
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3166




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: February 06, 2008, 07:53:23 PM »

I think just trying out a couple different sets of strings will fix what you hear.  If not, check out the saddle as suggest to be sure it is fitted and flat properly.  If none of that isn't doing it, then I think you should get your hands on a rosewood and check it out.  I love my rw OM.
Logged

bluesman67
HOGTOP CHARLOTTE

www.reverbnation.com/hogtopcharlotte
Tycho
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2816




Ignore
« Reply #35 on: February 06, 2008, 10:25:46 PM »

I think just trying out a couple different sets of strings will fix what you hear.  If not, check out the saddle as suggest to be sure it is fitted and flat properly.  If none of that isn't doing it, then I think you should get your hands on a rosewood and check it out.  I love my rw OM.

It's funny, just lately my rosewood OM has started sounding too bright to me.  I may try the D'Addarios, which I've never used.
Logged

D-03RE
D-03-12

...and several other guitars.
knowspicker
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 104




Ignore
« Reply #36 on: February 07, 2008, 02:13:07 AM »

It's funny, just lately my rosewood OM has started sounding too bright to me.  I may try the D'Addarios, which I've never used.

You might want to check your humidity level. For me dryer usually equals brighter.
Logged
JohnT
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 18




Ignore
« Reply #37 on: February 08, 2008, 11:00:58 PM »

I just joined this thread, and I think I understand what gouzos is talking about. And switching to rosewood isn't the answer. I have an OM-03R, about ten months old, played about 8 hours per week, so it's reasonably broken in. It sounds like we have the same concern.

The comparison I draw is between C played on the A string, third fret, and G played on the low E, same fret. The C sounds just fine, full with nice sustain. The G at the same fret just drops off dramatically. Now, the open E also sounds just fine, so I'm not convinced it is either the string or the saddle/nut. But I'll probably try both eventually. 
Asking a luthier to shave braces makes me nervous, but maybe that's the way to go?

John
Logged
jeremy3220
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4598




Ignore
« Reply #38 on: February 08, 2008, 11:54:09 PM »

After revisting this thread I'm changing my vote to strings. I listened to the clips and the most prominent feature I hear in most of them is the strings and not much body, one or two of them thats about all you can hear. Alot of that is due to using a video camera instead of actual audio recording equipment. The reason the parlor doesn't sound like your other guitar is because it just doesn't produce those frequencies. So my suggestion is to just get strings that are really bright for a lond time - elixers or something.


The comparison I draw is between C played on the A string, third fret, and G played on the low E, same fret. The C sounds just fine, full with nice sustain. The G at the same fret just drops off dramatically. Now, the open E also sounds just fine, so I'm not convinced it is either the string or the saddle/nut. But I'll probably try both eventually. 


could be the fret(s) not seated as well as it could.
Logged

Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: