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Author Topic: Ever wonder why some yahoos get rid or their guitars so soon after buying them ?  (Read 3691 times)
bjstrings
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« Reply #20 on: January 14, 2008, 12:31:22 AM »

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Kind of makes shipping from here to the UK not seem so bad, huh.

I have no idea what it would be to ship a guitar to me here in China.  Somebody told me US$200 once.  I buy and ship to a US address and carry it back here when I go to the US on a trip.  Cuts down on random guitar purchases, too -- altho on my last trip, I came back with two guitars!
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2008, 12:38:24 AM »

I have found it to be true that in general most people are not happy with what they have.  This could mean their house, spouse, body, boat, car, job, kids, general status in society and guitars.  The list could go on and on.  I've also noticed that people think that if they change these things, especially the one bugging them the most at the time, that their life and more importantly their happiness will finally be complete.  This never works, but we fool ourselves into giving it one more shot again...and again...and again...until 6 of our buddies are carrying us in a box to a hole. 


The first step is to realize material things don't satisfy, the second is to realize you can't escape those desires.
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Caleb
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« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2008, 01:20:49 AM »

The first step is to realize material things don't satisfy, the second is to realize you can't escape those desires.
While I'm not sure we can ever completely escape the desires, I do think that we can get a lot further down the road to overcoming them than we think we can. 
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larry28
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« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2008, 05:31:46 AM »

Could be a strange form of bulimia.
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drewzee87t
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« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2008, 08:17:15 AM »

I am in agreement with BJStrings on this. I am also a frequent GAS sufferer but find that I so over-analyze and research any guitar purchase that by the time I get it, it's a keeper. I generally don't sell guitars.

So, other than those that don't have access to the store to get stuff they like, there are those, as pointed out - who just have money and like to get new stuff and trade it around, taste all the varieties, and keep those they like. If you have some discretionary cash and love to play guitar, that's a nice hobby to have. You get to get excited about new stuff all the time, and in general, you aren't going to lose too much money trying out different stuff unless you shop stupid.

For me, I have seven in the stable, three acoustics that are all wonderful in their own way and none of which I would consider getting rid of. In the electrics, I have been upgrading cheaper or less satisfying guitars and keeping the numbers at four. I am itching for a G&L ASAT Z3 right now bad, remembering the early 70's tele I had back in the late 80's and sold for chump change. I am happy with all my guitars but am always thinking how to make it better. I don't need the ASAT. I really didn't like the tele that much or I wouldn't have sold it (STUPID!). I probably won't get the ASAT anytime soon. I need a friend to buy one, and bring it over to jam on. That's what I need.

Then there are the obsessive compulsives. Just need to have something new to jones for. And once they get it they are done with it. Hunt is better than the catch? I think a lot of these guys aren't even players, or certainly not ones that have been playing long or know much. The harley types (go ahead and get pissed - flame away). But the beauty of the instrument, and the fine sound of hitting an open G on a custom shop brazilian does not sound so sweet? Does not the abounding inlay and shell work and fine workmanship make for satisfaction? I can sit and look at my guitars all day long and just be so ...satisfied. Same goes for the harley. They are a bike, a tool, and a work of art at the same time. And many are addicted to collecting them.

I think there are many things that cause people to buy/sell and never find keepers, one of which is just base consumerism. We don't need 80% of the crap we have and we still go on looking for more. It's an addiction that finds people that are looking for something external to fill a need that should be from within and from healthy social interaction. So we need cars and guitars and jewels and big houses and our cats need therapy and backrubs. I need someone to come over and change my strings and polish my guitars :)

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LaminateBoy
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« Reply #25 on: January 14, 2008, 03:50:57 PM »

.....no need for two guitars.....so I sold the OMV....it is pretty simple logic actually and makes complete sense.

Tammy


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« Reply #26 on: January 14, 2008, 04:32:08 PM »

I've been known to buy and sell guitars, but what I don't get is people who buy a guitar then sell it two or three months later.   I understand how buyer's remorse works, but Ifigure if there's something that led you to buy an instrument in the first place, you should give yourself a chance to settle in with it and see what you think after a year or so.  I have a 2006 Martin D-18V with no issues at all that I bought last summer -- and I was already at least the third owner!  Crazy.
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #27 on: January 14, 2008, 05:52:05 PM »

I am especially amused when the perpretrator knows all three chords (Including the one used to plug it in).
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boyds
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« Reply #28 on: January 14, 2008, 06:21:32 PM »

I did not read all the posts because after reading The Creature's first post on the 1st page I HAD to give him a +1 Could not agree more. I feel the same way and could not have written it more eloquently.
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« Reply #29 on: January 14, 2008, 08:12:43 PM »

It is a malady that affects more then just guitar players. I think it's displacement activity to substitute for dealing with substantitive issues. Internet forums also seem to have their own addictive qualities. Just think how many great guitar players there would be if everyone spent most of their spare time playing and practicing instead of forum lurking and instrument acquisition.


I love the Quote from Walter Beker.
"when you die do you want to be remembered as a great guitar owner or a great guitar player"
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guitom
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« Reply #30 on: January 14, 2008, 08:58:09 PM »

What rbpicker said.

I do it all the time, sometimes keeping the guitar for 2-3 months.  I only buy guitars I like and actually buy them to keep, but if they can't replace one of my existing keepers it has to go.   I enjoy it and so far I'm still ahead (barely) moneywise.  I'll probably continue since it's the only hobby I have, besides actually playing the guitar and gigging. And it's fun coming up with new reasons to justify a new guitar purchase.  I'm sorry if I've offended anyone. 
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bluesman67
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« Reply #31 on: January 14, 2008, 09:52:43 PM »

It is a malady that affects more then just guitar players. I think it's displacement activity to substitute for dealing with substantitive issues. Internet forums also seem to have their own addictive qualities. Just think how many great guitar players there would be if everyone spent most of their spare time playing and practicing instead of forum lurking and instrument acquisition.


I love the Quote from Walter Beker.
"when you die do you want to be remembered as a great guitar owner or a great guitar player"

Unfortunately, the latter is out of my reach.
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bluesman67
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flatlander
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« Reply #32 on: January 14, 2008, 10:23:07 PM »

I am especially amused when the perpretrator knows all three chords (Including the one used to plug it in).
Haaaaaaaaa. Now that's a keeper Mr. Duck!
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bearsville0
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« Reply #33 on: January 15, 2008, 03:35:28 AM »

It is a malady that affects more then just guitar players. I think it's displacement activity to substitute for dealing with substantitive issues.

such as....?
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jimmyd
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« Reply #34 on: January 15, 2008, 01:06:46 PM »

such as....?

People get obsessive about all kinds of things and objects take on more importance then the activities they are supposed to support. Sporting equipment, cars, wood working,  quilting, gardening, you name it. Some wood workers are equipment junkies much like guitar players. They obsess over their tools and always want the latest jigs, router tables, etc,  Wood working forums have many more posts and discussions about the latest equipment  then about building and finishing techniques. sound familiar?

I place greater value in improving as a musician then in owning better and better instruments. Same for wood working and guitar building.
Another quote on this subject comes to mind.
"It ain't the arrow, it's the Indian".
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #35 on: January 15, 2008, 01:21:45 PM »

Indian sometime say, "Hmmm this arrow no good! This arrow better! Who make this arrow? I use only his arrows from now on!"
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bluesman67
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« Reply #36 on: January 15, 2008, 01:27:53 PM »

 
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bluesman67
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bearsville0
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« Reply #37 on: January 15, 2008, 01:33:58 PM »

People get obsessive about all kinds of things and objects take on more importance then the activities they are supposed to support.  Wood working forums have many more posts and discussions about the latest equipment  then about building and finishing techniques. sound familiar?

I place greater value in improving as a musician then in owning better and better instruments.

I suspect people might also need something to do in between the time they are practicing/performing. After all, you can only physically play or build so many hours a day, and there are 24 hours to enjoy each and every day. Why not spend some of the rest of the time admiring your nuts and bolt?  Have you seen the book about John Entwhistle's guitar collection?

The question for me is whether it's an anxiety ridden, obsessive (and ultimately unsatisfying) activity. If not, then the appreciation and acquisition of stuff is not really a problem. In fact you're supporting the artisans and keeping people employed.

OTOH, how many of us think it's cool to pretend we don't care about stuff, like Basquiat painting in (and ruining) an expensive suit, or Townshend smashing his guitar. All for the love of art.

"He who's used up the most toys when he dies, wins."
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Caleb
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« Reply #38 on: January 15, 2008, 02:51:41 PM »

People get obsessive about all kinds of things and objects take on more importance then the activities they are supposed to support. Sporting equipment, cars, wood working,  quilting, gardening, you name it. Some wood workers are equipment junkies much like guitar players. They obsess over their tools and always want the latest jigs, router tables, etc,  Wood working forums have many more posts and discussions about the latest equipment  then about building and finishing techniques. sound familiar?

I place greater value in improving as a musician then in owning better and better instruments. Same for wood working and guitar building.
Another quote on this subject comes to mind.
"It ain't the arrow, it's the Indian".
I agree 100%.  What is missed in all of the "getting" is the real love of the art.  Don't get me wrong, it's fun to collect and get new stuff, but I think it's a bit scary for some folks to stop all of that and finally face the art and be forced to see where they are with it. I don't know how many hours I wasted online reading about gear and lusting after it, or hanging around in guitar shops pawing after things that 1) I couldn't afford or had no business buying and 2) didn't need anyway.  That time would have been MUCH better spend with the gear I already owned making music and getting better.   
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bearsville0
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« Reply #39 on: January 15, 2008, 02:56:06 PM »

I don't know how many hours I wasted online reading about gear and lusting after it, or hanging around in guitar shops pawing after things that 1) I couldn't afford or had no business buying and 2) didn't need anyway. 

Why does lust get such a bad rap? It's just one more way to spend free time.
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