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Author Topic: Anybody here typically play like this?  (Read 1646 times)
didymus21
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« on: August 10, 2007, 12:49:51 AM »

I'm trying to figure out if there are a lot of people that play like this, of if it's just a select few.  If it's only a few...is that because many don't want to play this way, or because they can't?


http://youtube.com/watch?v=uNw9YaXemlM

http://youtube.com/watch?v=0qTnkbcKyFg
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Dale_I
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« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2007, 03:02:53 AM »

I see/hear more and more playing slap style. I don't think it is overly difficult once you practice a bit. Most guys are playing it with alternative tuning on the guitar, which makes it a bit easier to voice chord and scale structures open, harmonic, or playing single fret. It is still an acquired talent, and one that takes some training and practice.

For me, and this is totally personal opinion here, I like it for a song or two. But, too much of it turns into being a bit boring. I guess if you listened to the New Age genre a lot you probably wouldn't mind it as much. But, I would still think that everyone could expand their personal playing by taking a slap song and learning to play it proficiently.
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Caleb
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« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2007, 05:31:53 PM »


For me, and this is totally personal opinion here, I like it for a song or two. But, too much of it turns into being a bit boring.
I agree.  The slapping and slap harmonics are a good "accent" piece to a good song, but too much of it is overkill.  I used a bit of slap harmonics in my own playing, but it's always used as an accent and done when I believe it's tasteful.  I guess I picked it up from watching/listening to Phil Keaggy for so many years, though I'm nowhere near as good as him at it.  I really like the way Phil uses them in his playing.  He throws one in every now ad then and it always seems to fit. 
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uke richard
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« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2007, 07:27:07 PM »

I too can enjoy it but I tire of it fast when it is the MAIN way to play.

There is one who plays in that style who is associated in some way with Larrivee:

Raul Midon

He is the one we see on the front page of the Larrivee website.



Raul Midon - The Official Web Site
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golfmaniac1
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« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2007, 10:01:49 PM »

Ha ha Matt you found my favorite artist!!  Yes spirtual groove is mostly slap and air tap but almost all of his other songs are very tastfully done with an excellent use of hamonics, at least thats how I see it.  I do agree with you guys on the slap playing being a bit overwhelming and if a song is primarily composed with it, I don't think it consists the beaty and originality of traditional playing.  Antoine does a great job in some of his other songs, my facorites are "developement" and "glimmer of hope". 
P.S. I just got done playing the L-10 you so reluctantly sold to me... and I'm absolutely in love.  It is probably the most amazing instrument I've ever played.  Thanks again Matt!!
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didymus21
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« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2007, 10:53:17 PM »

Yeah man...lot's of songs written on that beauty...and she was well cared for.  I'm definitely feeling like an idiot for letting that one go!  Have fun with it...and when the "guitar buying bug" bites you again, you know who will buy it back!

RE: Antoine Dufour.  I'm a big fan of Trilogie.  It's different...a lot of different emotions in that one.
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Jammin J
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« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2007, 03:27:55 PM »

First off....I have to say that I'm a newbie when it comes to Acoustic guitars in general. I've listened to and played electrics for the past 12 years, while my lone acoustic sat in the corner, rarely getting played.

It's only been in the past few months that I've picked up the acoustic and began to dive into the "non-amplified" world. In doing so, I've recently discovered Antoine Dufour and Andy McKee and I was blown away! This style of music made me really think outside the box when it came to the acoustic guitar. It was very different than what I listened to or thought of when it came to the acoustic. It was inspiring, though I have lightyears to go if I hope to be able to play something like that as proficiently as they do.

I've always been fascinated by fret board acrobatics and a lot of my favorite guitarists are shredders like Vai, Satriani, Gilbert ........and they are great at what they do, they rip it up! Dufour and McKee (IMO) fall in to the same type of genre. They do some amazing things that most folks are either not doing or can not do.

Now would I want to listen to that style of music for 2 hours straight.....I doubt it. It can become over bearing and repetitive. I saw Yngwie Malmsteen live.....and after 20 minutes I was board, I mean how many 64th notes can you play and still keep it interesting. But if you take this style of music in small chunks, I think it stays fresh and innovative. It keeps those creative juices flowing by taking your music into new and exciting places.

I try to learn something from all my favorite players....even if it's just one little thing, it becomes part of your bag of tricks and it helps you create "your style".

Just my thoughts....  bigrin

J
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G Man
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« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2007, 06:18:16 PM »

Doesn't really do anything for me, its more like a dog and pony show, neet trick, now let's hear some music.  With that said, however, I remember being really impressed with it when I first saw George Beson doing his jazz take on it many moons ago.
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« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2007, 07:47:51 PM »

I'm trying to figure out if there are a lot of people that play like this, of if it's just a select few.  If it's only a few...is that because many don't want to play this way, or because they can't?


A lot of players who like to compete seems to gravitate towards these techniques. Ultimately, do they serve the music or are they distractions? Try LISTENING to Memories of the Future  - http://youtube.com/watch?v=vRvRBQTqUKI  - (hide the browser window). Then play it again and WATCH what Antoine does. Only you can decide, but I think there's no other way of achieving the notes he does.

For me, the thing is "hum-able" unlike some other popular videos that don't have a discernable melody (IMHO), but make for great TV...

Back to competitions: I think there's an honest effort to weed out the noise, by having the performers hidden from the judges, so the music is scored on its own merit.
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« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2007, 08:09:56 PM »

Gotta tell you that I shut it off after about 30 seconds. Hated it. So no I don't and don't want to play like that. 
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Johnny M
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« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2007, 01:12:20 AM »

A lot of players who like to compete seems to gravitate towards these techniques. Ultimately, do they serve the music or are they distractions? Try LISTENING to Memories of the Future  - http://youtube.com/watch?v=vRvRBQTqUKI  - (hide the browser window). Then play it again and WATCH what Antoine does. Only you can decide, but I think there's no other way of achieving the notes he does.

For me, the thing is "hum-able" unlike some other popular videos that don't have a discernable melody (IMHO), but make for great TV...

Back to competitions: I think there's an honest effort to weed out the noise, by having the performers hidden from the judges, so the music is scored on its own merit.

I liked it!

Thanks for the link.

John
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didymus21
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« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2007, 01:39:14 AM »

Yeah, I like it too.  Complex.
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« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2007, 08:44:34 PM »

Aside from being a really annoying technique to listen to over and over and over and over and over...well, you get the picture, it seems that the technique drives the music. Each piece seems to go round and round in circles for a while and then moves on to another spot and goes round and round in more circles and so on. All these little circles are like modules which can be interchanged from one song to another.
I greatly admire the technical skill involved in the playing, but the music leaves me cold.
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