Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: best guitar humidifying device?  (Read 1494 times)
Dan
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 162


WWW

Ignore
« on: July 19, 2007, 03:08:15 AM »

Ive been checking out the humidifying devices and i really dont know what to get. What is the best hygrometer and best humidifying devices I can get and not spend a fortune. I also dont really want to have to worry about leakage and all that stuff. Are the planet waves products good or should i look at something else? Thanks.

Dan
Logged

Dan
Dale_I
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1209




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2007, 03:25:42 AM »

Dan,

I'm using the planet waves humidifier and hygrometer after trying some lesser versions and am very pleased. DO NOT waste you time/money on the small containers of clay. They were the largest waste of my resources. However, I am not using the sound hole version of the planet waves humidifier. My guitars all have electronics installed and I didn't want to take the chance on leakage and etc. I am using the oval shaped case humidifiers. No problem if the case liner happens to get a little wet.

We usually bounce around 30% humidity and the hygrometers generally read between 40% and 45% when I open the case.
Logged

"The barrier to knowledge is the belief that you have it"

2006 Larrivee LV-10 MR   1980 Les Paul Custom Natural   Larrivee LV-03-12   1998 Carvin LB75 Koa Bass
Dan
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 162


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2007, 03:29:47 AM »

Dale, How do you mount this unit in your case? Velcro?
Logged

Dan
brandon
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1295




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2007, 04:14:35 AM »

planet waves seem to make pretty good guitar accessories and stuff. i enjoy collecting the players points in hopes of getting enough for the bar stool!
Logged

in His grasp,
brandon

D-60 (rosie)
OMV-50
O-60
imwjl
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 340




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2007, 12:54:32 PM »

The measuring part:
Hardware stores always seem to have a plenty fine hygrometer either side of $10 US. Target stores usually have a sub-$40 Oregon Scientific digital thermo, hygro, baro with remote. Both the analog and digital units I have will fit in a guitar case, and clearly fit anywhere near.

The humidification part:
You don't have to spend much. I have some commercial products (Damp-IT, PlanetWaves), but they work no better or worse than a clean piece of sponge in a small zip-type bag with holes in it. I keep the sponge squeezed in a u shape in the snack-sized bags and make holes where the U shape is open. No leaks, and it brigs the humidity up as fast or faster than anything else.

The opposite:
Zort-It sells a product that while not same as HumidiPak is a fraction of the price. The Zorb-It packs in my guitar case help when the humidity goes way high, and the "ci" versions have a corrosion inhibitor.

Ambient Domain:
I will keep the guitars I am not actively playing (playing withing a day or two) in my basement near my whole-room de-humidifier. This keeps them at 45-50% at times when summer has the rest of the home 60-80%, and in the winter the basement is always more humid than the rest of the house. The central air conditioning brings the whole house closer to 40%.

This may not be perfect, but it has worked for one guitar I've owned for 30 years.
Logged
skramer
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 93




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2007, 10:26:22 PM »

This is a problem. I have tried home methods and many of the other methods already mentioned.  My solution is Planet Waves "humidipak".  It has solve most problems and no more instruments, gauges, measuring, etc.  Simple and it works.  Try it, you'll like it.
Logged

Larrivee OM-03RE
Larrivee Parlor P-1
Framus Mahogany Archback Classical (1949)
Gibson Les Paul Standard
brandon
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1295




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2007, 11:49:10 PM »

hey skramer, how much are the replacement packettes?
Logged

in His grasp,
brandon

D-60 (rosie)
OMV-50
O-60
Dan
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 162


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2007, 02:48:03 AM »

Yea how much and where in the world can you get them from?
Logged

Dan
brandon
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1295




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2007, 02:18:47 PM »

you can get the humidipak system off musiciansfriend. i think i saw it on there last night. planetwaves.com also has a nice tutorial about how the system works. might be my next purchase.
Logged

in His grasp,
brandon

D-60 (rosie)
OMV-50
O-60
Peter Cree
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1110


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2007, 02:50:55 PM »

IMHO.........................since you asked, is to get the guitar out of that case and on a stand, and allow the summer humidity to get to all parts of the guitar.   anything from 40% up is good and by not having it in the case the entire guitar is evenly humidified.

During dry winter months or if you live in the Rockies, use the 20.00 hunter (wal-mart) warm mist , not sonic, humidifer.  That 'll keep the fretboard and the entire guitar equalized.  Sonic air humidifiers don't transport the moisture well unless you have a full house system.
Logged

Peter
creestudios.com
Art Guitars and more
Dale_I
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1209




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2007, 05:01:14 PM »

Dale, How do you mount this unit in your case? Velcro?

Dan - The small instrument humidifier comes with a safety pin style clasp on the back. I put the loop right through the case liner and it holds it in place. The large instrument humidifier I use with my 12 string since it sits in the case for longer periods of time. That has velcro attachments.

A note should be given about your ambient conditions. Depending on where you live, some might need less humidity and some may need more. Similarly, your house furnace might change the outside ambient conditions and remove some of the humidity from the air. You should really have a hygrometer in the area where you store your guitars to see if you need to add or remove humidity. In my area, I need to add almost 90% of the year, and the other 10% really isn't into anything over 55% to 60%, so humidifiers work well.
Logged

"The barrier to knowledge is the belief that you have it"

2006 Larrivee LV-10 MR   1980 Les Paul Custom Natural   Larrivee LV-03-12   1998 Carvin LB75 Koa Bass
toneonguitar
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 51




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2007, 03:25:12 AM »

you can get the humidipak system off musiciansfriend.

Yes, but get in line they are on back order currently...
Logged
ibisimon
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 81




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: July 22, 2007, 11:56:39 AM »

Humidity is fine on the 140 year old farm, 3 seasons. I run 2 dehumidifiers to level out the basement humidity.  In the winter I put the guitars in my 1 year old office. Last year I kept temps around 65 degrees. Humidity was fine according to the Alverez case. This year I am adding a 20 gallon Fish tank to the room. Am I nuts to think that might do it?
Logged
imwjl
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 340




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: July 22, 2007, 01:08:48 PM »

IMHO.........................since you asked, is to get the guitar out of that case and on a stand, and allow the summer humidity to get to all parts of the guitar.   anything from 40% up is good and by not having it in the case the entire guitar is evenly humidified.

During dry winter months or if you live in the Rockies, use the 20.00 hunter (wal-mart) warm mist , not sonic, humidifer.  That 'll keep the fretboard and the entire guitar equalized.  Sonic air humidifiers don't transport the moisture well unless you have a full house system.

Sarcasm: Out of the case is fine if you do not have 3 y.o. twins, a 6 y.o. and Labrador dog both taller and longer than ave!

:)
Logged
woodruff
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 186




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: July 23, 2007, 08:19:58 PM »

i still like and use Kyser Lifeguards.
Logged

Woody

2006 L-03-WL
1963 Martin 0-16NY(wife's)
bluesman67
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3166




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: July 24, 2007, 09:14:29 PM »

I'll give a vote to the Kyser Lifeguards
Logged

bluesman67
HOGTOP CHARLOTTE

www.reverbnation.com/hogtopcharlotte
brandon
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1295




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: July 24, 2007, 09:27:03 PM »

checked out the humidipak and i believe that the replacement packs are around 7 bucks a pop. the humidipak requires two in the soundhole and one under the headstock bringing the total to 3 at 7 bucks a pop which would be 21 bucks roughly every 4 months. seems a bit pricey to me but i am a college student. i guess you have to pay for convenience.
Logged

in His grasp,
brandon

D-60 (rosie)
OMV-50
O-60
brandon
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1295




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: July 24, 2007, 09:28:50 PM »

will the kyser lifeguard fit my d-60 since it has an enlarged soundhole??
Logged

in His grasp,
brandon

D-60 (rosie)
OMV-50
O-60
SteveD216
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 111


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #18 on: July 27, 2007, 02:38:46 PM »

IMHO.........................since you asked, is to get the guitar out of that case and on a stand, and allow the summer humidity to get to all parts of the guitar.   anything from 40% up is good and by not having it in the case the entire guitar is evenly humidified


While I agree getting the guitars out of the cases in the warmer months, be careful of humidity too high, here is a description of the effects of 60% relative humidity:

"What happens to my guitar at 60% humidity?
At 60% relative humidity or above symptoms may include tarnished frets and strings, corrosion to nickel, chrome or gold plating on tuning machines, swelling of the top, high action and loose braces and bridges."
Logged

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: