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Author Topic: My First Neck Reset - Yamaha FG150 Red Label  (Read 14634 times)
drathbun
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« on: July 10, 2007, 03:12:18 AM »

Well I started my two week guitar repair course today by removing the neck on my 1968 Yamaha FG150 Red Label to prepare it for a neck reset. I will be doing a photo journal of my course and post the photos and my experiences here for those who are interested. I also have a new, but damaged Epiphone EJ160e in the shop to practice repairing a top crack and binding break.

After watching four hours of Dan Erlewine doing resets and refrets, Miles led me through getting the neck off the Yammie. I had already done a sight down the neck and a straightedge test of the Yamaha and the straightedge pointed to the bottom of the bridge and there was no saddle left to speak of... definite neck reset candidate.

Upon closer examination, it was clear the fretboard was beginning to separate at the nut. So we determined to heat the entire fretboard, not just the extension. We also discovered some loose bracing that will require attention. So, after pulling out the pickup, taking off the strings, the tuners and the nut, I put the low watt heater pad and a caul on the fretboard and clamped them with a couple of F clamps.



After about 3 minutes, I noticed a puff of smoke... Miles said "Ooops smoked a fret marker". We pulled off the heat pad and sure enough the fret markers were toast. We just dug them out with an exacto. They are easy enough to replace. Miles ran a spatula under the pickguard and removed it very quickly by working it back and forth with the "runout". (I still can't see the runout... but I'll practice). Then he ran the spatula under the fretboard extension to loosen the glue there.

Miles then pulled the 15 fret and drilled a hole for the steam needle to penetrate the neck pocket. It was drilled off centre in the middle of the fret slot to avoid the truss rod. Steam from Mr. Coffee was inserted into the hole with a long hose and needle. Miles also added the neck removal jig which applies pressure to the heel of the neck while holding the body firm.



We put the neck in the vise and wiggled the body to loosen the glue (which I suspected was hide glue given the age of the guitar - I was right). Miles drilled another hole on the other side of the fret slot as it was not giving up easily. More steam was added and this did the trick. Not before we crushed the heel of the guitar neck with the caul on the jig. We have plans for that repair (well Miles does).

Here is the neck pocket right after removal.



Here is the neck dovetail immediately after removal.



I cleaned up the neck dovetail and the neck pocket with a very sharp chisel (like a hot knife through butter) getting rid of all the hide glue and shims and put the neck back on the guitar. We then sighted down the neck and determined it wasn't really to badly under set.



Tomorrow morning I will be doing some math to figure out how much neck material to remove. We will remove the fretboard, clean it up and reglue it. Then we'll do the reset. The next day, if all goes well I'll do a fretboard level and refret/dress. I will be cutting a new nut and saddle from bone. Once the Yammie is done, it will be on to the Epiphone and then to setting up my Rickenbackers.

Gonna be fun!

Doug
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« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2007, 03:19:38 AM »

 +1

Looking forward to lots more pics! 

Have a  on me!  I love threads like this, thanks.
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« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2007, 10:29:09 AM »

Fascinating stuff  ...good luck with next stage of the "surgery" 

Pete
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« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2007, 01:24:25 PM »

Fun stuff.Its addicting.
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« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2007, 04:12:33 AM »

Day #2.

Well day #2 started in a boring fashion with Miles having me REview the 2hr video on neck resetting!  crying

Then I got to the good stuff. I had finished cleaning up the male and female ends of the neck and dovetail and chiseled a little valley on both cheeks of the heel yesterday. So Miles left me to put sign painter's tape on the shoulders and calculate the amount of reset needed. Took me a couple of tries at the formula but it finally worked out right. I needed less than I had thought, needing to raise the neck angle at the bridge by 1/8". I taped the shoulders and put masking tape on the heel indicating the amount of material needed to change the neck angle.



Then I pulled 80 grit sandpaper with equal strokes on both sides of the heel by putting the sandpaper under the heel (grit towards the underside of the heel), pressing down on the neck and pulling it out in long strokes. I did this evenly and sighted down the neck after about 4-6 strokes each time.



When the sighting got close to where I wanted to be (level with the top of the bridge) I checked the centre line of the neck from the nut the the bridge:



I discovered I was slightly strong on the treble side... so I gave the treble side about 4 extra strokes which swung the neck back to centre. Then I gave equal strokes until I could sight right in line with the bridge. At that point, I inserted some paper temp shims in the neck pocket and pressed the neck back in to check with a heavy straighedge down the length of the fingerboard. The straightedge lined up perfectly with the top of the bridge!

It was then time to repair a chunk that had pulled out of the heel. Miles put some CA glue and accelerator on the chip and pressed it into place. Two seconds and done.



Then I spent about an hour repairing the chunks out of the dovetail. I chiseled the damaged area out into an even surface, measured it with a micrometer and chiseled a replacement piece out of a block of mahogany. Matching them up took some detailed work and some finessing by Miles.



We then glued the pieces in with Titebond and put cauls on both sides and clamped it.



Tomorrow I will chisel the excess on the dovetail to make it smooth and reshim the neck pocket and glue the neck in. Then I will be removing and regluing the fingerboard, leveling it and refretting it. I'm getting excited!

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« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2007, 05:09:21 AM »

drathbun

How nice for you to be able to jump into this arena.   I envy anyone who has the skill, patience, and determination to take on something like this.  I wish I did.   Unfortunately I reach the peak of my skill level just by installing a stap button.   I'll be watching your progress as you post the journal here.   Good luck with this and your future projects. 
I salute you sir............   
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« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2007, 09:40:36 AM »

...I'm just waiting for luthier-cam... yes, live action guitar maker workshop... thats what we want 

Pete
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« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2007, 12:34:44 PM »

Great Work Doug, 

I wish there was something like this around me because I would LOVE to take a guitar repair course. I've always loved woodworking, and this just looks like it would be right up my alley. I'll have to look into it a little more.
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« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2007, 12:45:55 PM »

Doug,
Tried sending a PM but your inbox is full. If you don't mind, could you tell me how much you are paying for the two week course. How often do you meet. Is it one on one or is it a group?
Thanks
Jeff

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« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2007, 12:13:20 AM »

bhika,

Sorry about, I just dumped all my old messages.

The course is roughly $2500 Cdn. for two week intensive. You can get all the details from Miles Jones' website here:

http://www.fretwork.com/home.html

Doug
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« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2007, 12:34:17 AM »

Day #3.

I started today by taking my family to a Calgary Stampede free pancake breakfast! This is the best part of the Stampede IMHO!

Then I set to work chiseling the dovetail plugs so they were flush. A great tip from Miles was to darken the existing dovetail with pencil so you don't disturb any original dovetail surface. I think I did a pretty good job here:



Then I put the neck back on the guitar and sighted down the neck. I still wasn't happy with the amount of underset so I taped off the body and did the sandpaper treatment for quite a few strokes before I got the angle to where I could just see the back end of the bridge (Yammies have this wedge shaped bridge that gets thicker toward the end block of the guitar).

Then I set to work making shims for the dovetail. I cut out a 3" x 2" strip of thin maple and double taped one end of it to a block. I then ran the maple down a sanding block until it was a very thin wedge ragged and transparent at one end. "Airily thin" as Miles would say. I cut the strips to match the sides of the dovetail, checked the fit and then glued them in with hide glue and clamped them with cauls Miles made covered in wax paper.



I then started to prepare the surface of the body where the fretboard extension will be glued.



While waiting for the hide glue to dry, I noticed a dusty old guitar sitting in a guitar stand next to one of the workstations. I dusted it off and this is what it is... take a look folks!





OMG is that a gorgeous guitar??? The label reads Victoria BC, so it is a L09-12 of the late 70's to early '80's is my guess. It has two large splits in the top under the non-existent bridge and a couple of smaller cracks on the lower treble bout. An excellent example of Wendy Larrivee's inlay expertise with the seahorse on the head stock and lovely fret inlays. I asked Miles whether this guitar belonged to a customer and he said... "Ummmmm..... ahhh.... YES!"  whistling

After a half an hour, I took the clamps and cauls off and cleaned up the edges of the dovetail. We decided against taking the fretboard all the way off as it seems to only be separating from fret one to four. So I soaked a small spatula in hide glue, wedged the end of the fretboard and spread the glue in the crack. Then with neck cauls, clamped the fretboard. I left it this way until tomorrow.

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« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2007, 12:43:29 AM »

Day #4:

Today I took the neck out of the clamps and the fingerboard now looks nice and solid.

Miles then asked me if I wanted to change the neck profile at all. There was a little v-shaped flatness at the base of the headstock extending to almost the first fret that I wanted to get rid of, and also at least a hundred dents where over the previous 39 years the guitar had be dropped back against tables, chairs, amps, coffee tables etc. It made the neck feel like the edge of a truck tire.

So Miles gave me a rasp and said, "Go to it!". Jebus Crispies!  It is like taking a nine inch spike to a glossy coffee table! So I gingerly start pressing the rasp in little strokes making chicken scratches. He grabs the rasp and says "Lean into it boy!" and takes long heavy strokes stripping finish off to bare wood the length of the neck. Those of you who blanch at the thought of even putting in a strap button should stop reading, as it is not for the faint of heart or squeamish.

So I take the rasp and tear into the neck - not with abandon, but with the intent of getting the shape I want and removing all the finish.



I get the neck to this point and it is looking pretty good (to me). Miles looks at it and says "All of it!"... so I start rasping away at the heel. He comes back and says "What the hell are you doing!?" and gives me a lecture about being careful not to do damage. Sheesh!  yak Aparently I started taking some of the shape out of the heel. So I started working with a little more care:



I used a block and some 100 grit sandpaper to get the back and sides of the headstock clear of finish and then 120 grit on the rest of the neck.



The I refit the neck to the body and found it was a little looser than yesterday. I showed it to Miles and he found a problem with how I had been using the sandpaper to do the reset. Since I was so worried about staying away from the part of the cheek next to the fingerboard (the pivot point for the reset) I had only put the sandpaper to within 1/8" of that end of the heel to do the pulls. So what I achieved was a plateau of 1/8" BEFORE the reset angle. This flat was keeping the neck from falling flush.

After a long lecture from Miles on the value of not being a f***ing dumbass, I leveled it out with micro-touches of a chisel and a few more good pulls of sandpaper and the neck sat down beautifully. I added a couple of business card paper shims and pressed the neck into the neck pocket with an F-clamp and blocks. Tight as a drum, good neck angle and centred! Woohooo!

Time to refinish the neck. After masking off the dovetail and the headstock face (leaving it exactly as it is) Miles put some Methyl Hydrate over the neck (to get the stain to blend evenly) and then a few coats of stain on the neck to match the darkness of the body. Then Miles shot a 50/50 mixture of lacquer to thinner over the neck. He then put a thick, dark, pore filler paste over the entire neck and had me rub it down across the grain with burlap.

This is how I left the neck today:



Tomorrow we'll hopefully finish the finish on the neck and reglue the neck. Then I'll be pulling the frets, leveling the fretboard, refretting, dressing, cutting a new nut and saddle and doing a setup.

I can't wait to string it up! (Miles in my head says "Patience laddy buck!")
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« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2007, 12:54:54 AM »

Day #5:

Today started by wiping the neck down with naptha to remove the excess (and very dark) pore filler. Before we continued with refinishing the neck, I needed to cut a heel cap out of rosewood. When we were steaming the neck out last Monday, the neck held on by one side while the caul pushing the heel in the neck jig pressed down on the other and the heel compressed on one side. So we decided we'd make a rosewood heel cap.

I cut the basic shape out of a piece of rosewood with a coping saw and chiseled and filed it into the right shape but slightly bigger than needed.




Once I had it slightly proud on the sides, I put tightbond glue on it and clamped it. After removing the clamps 30 minutes later, I discovered the heel cap and moved slightly. Miles reminded me that is why we use plexiglass cauls so we can see the work in the clamp! He showed me a technique where you rub two pieces of 80 grit sandpaper together over the glue on the surface and the grit particals will keep the material from shifting. Miles quickly made a second piece and we glued that.



While doing this we noticed another piece of mahogany coming loose on the heel. This required some tightbond and some intricate clamping. The clamps removed, we noticed that the pony clamp had left a deep impression in the wood - it had become soft just from the damp cloth cleanup of the squeezeout.



Miles used a bunched damp cloth with a soldering pencil on the outside to create warm steam over the indent and the wood swelled back into place again... magic!

Miles mixed up some brown and red dye and stained the neck and touched up the shoulders of the body to match the guitar. He matched it beautifully! (You can see the dye on the neck in the photo above. Below Miles is colour testing the dye in the neck pocket.



While we were waiting for things to dry, Miles took a look at my Ephiphone EJ160e with the top damage. I bought this guitar for about $100 on ebay as a project for this course. It had been dropped pretty hard. The top has sprung from the sides from the middle of the endblock to the middle of the bass bout. The binding is broken and separated and there is a large crack and hole in the top along with finish cracks.



Miles took a long stick and after applying some water to the crack and broken seam, pushed from inside to get the top to settle back into the side. Then he clamped it and left it to dry. We will pickup with this guitar after the Yammie is done.
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« Reply #13 on: July 21, 2007, 04:13:03 PM »

Day #6:

We started working on the John Lennon Epiphone today, stabilizing the cracks in the top with CA glue. It is important to know that CA glue can be used on guitars with modern plastic finishes (poly) and NOT on guitars with nitrocellulose finishes. Because the poly finishes are plastic, the CA solvent will not affect it. Whereas the nitro finish will melt under CA solvent. So with a poly finish, you can put CA glue on it, file it, sand it and shoot lacquer over it.



Mile inspected the dent on the bottom side and felt it was deflected enough to require filling with CA glue. He built a "swimming pool" moat out of masking tape with the edges raised and filled the entire area with a huge amount of crazy glue.




I spent most of the day removing the pore filler from the Yamaha neck, shaping the heel cap, restaining the neck, a wash coat of lacquer (50/50), more pore filler, leveling the pour filler with wet sand 1000 grit to prepare the neck for a couple of coats of lacquer.



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« Reply #14 on: July 21, 2007, 04:36:06 PM »

Day 7:

After taking Sunday off, we returned to the shop Monday morning and removed the CA glue "dam" on the Epiphone. The CA glue was still, after about 38 hours, soft in places. Miles poked and cut into the CA and sprayed accelerator on it to harden it. He then took a large chisel and ripped through large chunks of it to get a relatively level filing surface.

Then I watched in awe as he ripped into the surface with intensity and a large rasp! This stuff is HARD!



He shaped it to a place where we could start using a sanding block and 80 grit.



Then I took it to a smoother surface with finer paper.



In the process of getting the surface level, we took off some of the colour, which was replaced, by Miles in gentle layers in the spray booth. An amazing transformation!



Miles shot another couple of coats of lacquer over the Yamaha neck and I wet sanded very very carefully with 1000 grit and varsol.



Once I had the surface smooth and flat, Miles gave it a final surface of lacquer. It looks incredible!



I started to work on my Yamaha pickguard. Earlier in its long life, someone reglued the pickguard with contact cement! We found that it broke down and got soft with thinner, so I carefully soften it on the guitar face and scraped it clean with a chisel. Miles got interested in my camera and started taking photos of me.



I then moved back to the Ephiphone and tried, unsuccessfully, four times to colour the leveled cracks with the colour marker. I just couldn't match the fade of the sunburst. So I masked off the outlines of the leveled crack...



and took it to the spray booth, where Miles let me go at it with the fine airbrush. It took two attempts but I think it looks great now. We would never be able to hide these cracks, especially on a sunburst, without refinishing the entire top of the guitar and that would be just insane for a $500 guitar.

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« Reply #15 on: July 21, 2007, 04:54:55 PM »

Day #8:

The last thing I did before leaving yesterday was to test fit the Yamaha neck into the neck pocket with my shims and do a dry run at clamping it up. Once I had all my materials together, I heated some hide glue and glued the dovetail and the neck pocket, fit it together and put the clamps, cauls and webstrap on the guitar. We needed to leave the guitar in the clamps for at least 24 hrs, so I brought my 2004 American Deluxe Strat in to work on setting it up to play "killer".



I spent the whole day working with the Strat. I masked off the headstock, took all the relief out of the neck so it was absolutely flat and lowered the action at the nut with the files until I could just see a tiny amount of daylight between the string and the first fret when fretting it at the third fret. Then I introduced just a slight bit of relief.

Since the American Deluxe Strat has a micro-tilt adjustment in the neck, Miles cranked it until the strings were parallel to the fretboard and my action is insanely low! Yes it rattles and buzzes when you play without an amp, but we got it so it is just on the edge where the buzz doesn't sound through the amp! KILLER! The guitar plays itself! I have to really work to keep my touch extremely light!

Here is the action at the 15th fret:



It measures a touch more than 3/64ths at the 12th fret!!!!
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« Reply #16 on: July 21, 2007, 05:37:50 PM »

Day 9/10:

I only got half days in the shop here. I took the Yamaha out of the blocks and checked the fit of the dovetail. It seems to be perfect. I checked the neck angle and it is precisely what I was looking for... I sight down the neck and the frets point to the very top of the bridge.

Now it is time to put the guitar in the neck jig. This is an amazing device. Basically it captures the tension and shape of the neck while strung to pitch and in playing position, so you can remove the strings and work on the neck with it in the right shape.



With the guitar strapped down to the jig with a webstrap, the guitar is strung and tuned to pitch. Then the jig is tilted forward into playing position. The neck gauges are set to zero and locked.



Once the jig is back level, the strings are removed and the post under the headstock is raised to force the neck back to the zero position on the forward gauge. Then string is tied around the neck at the nut and round a pin that pulls the nut down to zero the second neck gauge.
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« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2007, 07:21:05 PM »

Day #11:

I spent yesterday leveling the fretboard. This is probably the most difficult thing to grasp of all of the techniques I've learned so far. My previous understanding (out of ignorance) was that the fingerboard was leveled flat from end to end. That is an extreme simplification.

What I understand now is, the fretboard must be inspected first to understand its unique shape and how the truss rod behaves. I took all of the tension out of the truss rod to see how much relief I got (the guitar is in the jig which simulates string tension and gravity at playing position). I saw that I had plenty of relief... at least more than I would ever use. Then I cranked the truss rod to its extreme (without going crazy here) to see how much back bow I could get. I received a bit of back bow.

This told me that I had flexibility from back bow to full relief at string tension. So I put the neck as flat as I could get it (with a true straight edge) and sighted the neck. It was flat from the nut to about the 11th fret where I saw some fall away. I expected the fall away because I did not shim the fretboard extension after the neck reset. If I had a cutaway (access to the upper frets) I would have shimmed the extension.

I measured my fretboard radius and discovered it was 20". So I took a 20" leveling beam and stroked the fretboard from end to end to get an even radius. Then I took a shot filled sanding beam and after chalking the fretboard, I sanded in short strokes evenly across the board. There was a LOT of checking against the backlight for high spots which were marked with chalk and scraped away with a cabinet scraper.

According to Miles (and I believe him because I've played guitars he has worked on and they are KILLER) the secret of great playability is the following:

1. Some relief in the lower register - frets one to 6 (if people say they play with flat necks, they are insane according to Miles)

2. At roughly the sixth fret, the fingerboard should level out flat to just forward of where the heel mass begins

3. Somewhere forward of the neck mass is where the fall away begins. It is IMPORTANT that the fall away happens BEFORE the mass of the heel increases.

The problem with getting this is, when you add relief to the neck, you get a DISH shape which rises to meet the fall away in a hump which buzzes and rattles. The secret is to know where that hump is... (put the guitar into massive relief and sight it and mark it with chalk)... and make that hump at the end of the dish shape go away flat to intersect with the fall away forward of the neck mass.

I'm writing all this down so I remember it... because it makes all the difference.



In the above photo you see I have raised the lower part of the sanding beam with double layered cardstock and chalked out the upper part of the fretboard where the end of the dish (the hump) lives. I carefully sand evenly watching the area I of chalk I am sanding away.

Doing this took hours. I would sand a little, put the strings back on the guitar, check the neck, reset it in the jig and zero my gauges in playing position, pull the strings off, set the neck into string tension with the jig, check the neck again, put in some relief, check it again, mark the neck with chalk if there is still a hump and repeat the whole process. I think I did this five or six times.

I finally had the neck where I wanted it and started preparing the fret wire. I chose a standard Martin style medium fret height wire (6230?). I cut 4' of wire and then cut that in two 2' lengths. Then I went to the fret bender and set it to my 20" radius.



I ran the fret wire through the bender forward, then back while pulling it down as it came out of the bender, then forward again. This forward and backward bending hardens the wire. Before it went into the bender, I put a small notch on the back of the tang at about the half way point of the 2' section. I bent the wire forwards and backwards in the bender until the notch started to bend. This was the maximum amount of hardness. Miles claims doing this increases the longevity of the frets by YEARS!



Then I cut and racked my frets leaving about an 1/8" beyond the fretboard on both sides.

I then worked on replacing my dot fret markers which got toasted when we heated the fretboard during the reset. Miles found some 5mm dots just like the originals and we hand drilled and tapped them home slightly proud of the board. I leveled them carefully with a file.



I the photo you can see wax on the fretboard. We tried putting the first fret in and gluing it with hide glue. The slots are very wide and even with crimping, they wouldn't hold tight. So Miles had me spread melted paste wax (heated with a hair dryer) over the board up close to the slots to keep the CA glue from getting at it. We are going to CA glue the frets into place because the slots are so wide. If some are still too loose, there is a Dan Erlewyne technique where you put CA and mahogany dust on a razor blade and put it on one wall of the slot only.

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2016 Martin 000-28vs 12 fret

2014 Taylor 814ce

2014 Godin Multiac Classical

2012 Gibson "The Golden Age 1930's" SJ200

2012 Squier Vintage Modified 70's Jazz Bass

2010 Gretsch Electromatic G5122DC

2009 Taylor GA3-12e

2004 Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster

1981 Rickenbacker 320JG

1968 Yamaha FG150 Red La
Larrivee4me
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« Reply #18 on: July 23, 2007, 03:27:46 AM »

Thanks again for keeping us updated.  This is quite interesting!
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drathbun
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« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2007, 05:15:03 AM »

Day #12:

My last day became a few days actually. We discovered on day #11 that the fret slots were too wide to glue them in with hide glue. So I paste waxed the fretboard being careful not to get wax near or in the slot itself. This makes the clean up of the CA glue squeeze out much easier.

I then put a 20" radius brass die in the fret pressing grips, flowed CA glue into the slot and pressed them home with a caul under the neck:



When I got to the heel area, I rigged up some clamps, shims and cauls to support pressing them in with an F clamp and die (I don't know that "die" is the right term for the brass radius inserts). That only took me to fret 16 which is the end of the support from the neck block.



I put a Taylor Fret Buck on the face of the guitar and clamped it under the fretboard extension. That gave me the support to press the rest of the frets home with the F clamp.



Then I clipped the ends of the frets flush with the fretboard being careful to angle the nippers up slightly to keep from denting the sides.



Then I used a blue Sharpie to mark the top of each fret:



in preparation for:



leveling with a sanding beam. I put the neck into as flat a profile as I could before doing this step!!! After quite a bit of checking and rechecking with a straight edge across three frets at a time and using various fret files and blocks:



I used a fret beveler to angle the fret ends and take away any protrusions of tang from the fretboard sides.



Then I spent quite a bit of time with a fret end file, shaping the ends of the frets into the nicely contoured smooth shape we guitarists love so much! (no photo of this as I was totally engrossed).

Then I took the fret crowning file and filed each fret (after marking again with a blue sharpie) until only a sliver of blue on the very top of the fret was visible.



Then it was more checking for high or loose frets. I found two or three that were still not solid. I wouldn't have even noticed they were loose instead of being a high fret without Miles' keen eye. The straight edge rocks ever so slightly (I think high fret). Miles presses on the straight edge while supporting the neck from below and the rocking disappears.... LOOSE FRET! More thin CA glue into the slot and some accelerator and voila.. solid fret! Using the fret leveling beam earlier also identified some loose frets from the squeak they make.

Once I had all the frets level (with an absolutely flat neck it is important for me to add and REMEMBER), I strung it up and gave the neck some relief. It sounded like a banjo! The saddle was so low it needed a replacement. So Miles walked me through the process of building a new bone saddle from a blank. In his skilled hands it took no more than 30 minutes from blank to stringing the guitar up.



The guitar now plays and sound KILLER! (technical term for Holy Sheep -CENSORED- Batman!)

I was going to bring "Little Hippie" home but I discovered a loose brace and hide glued it and clamped it and left it over night. When I returned this morning, I took it out of the clamps, pressed on the top and the brace popped loose again. So I slathered on the hide glue this time, after roughing all surfaces under the brace and clamped it back up. We'll see whether it comes home from the hospital tomorrow or not!
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2016 Martin 000-28vs 12 fret

2014 Taylor 814ce

2014 Godin Multiac Classical

2012 Gibson "The Golden Age 1930's" SJ200

2012 Squier Vintage Modified 70's Jazz Bass

2010 Gretsch Electromatic G5122DC

2009 Taylor GA3-12e

2004 Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster

1981 Rickenbacker 320JG

1968 Yamaha FG150 Red La
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