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Author Topic: Lemon Oil on My Larrivée Ebony Fretboard?  (Read 9757 times)
Danny
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« Reply #40 on: December 03, 2008, 05:41:53 AM »

  I use a lemon oil that has no silicone for fretboards, it helps clean and restore a deep rich look to the boards. I think some of the things we hear are overkill. Unless we expect our gits to last a hundred years.
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« Reply #41 on: December 03, 2008, 05:45:05 PM »

flatlander, I have no information relative to lemon oil on fretboards.  You have to draw you own conclusions.  I can only reiterate what is recommended by those who do historical preservation to fine woodwork.  I have on the other hand witnessed the damage that can be done by non drying oils and dirt accumulation to fine furniture.
  Best to you.
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dberch
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« Reply #42 on: December 03, 2008, 08:44:22 PM »

I think some of the things we hear are overkill. Unless we expect our gits to last a hundred years.
Why the heck not? They certanly could last that long if cared for properly.
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flatlander
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« Reply #43 on: December 03, 2008, 10:38:05 PM »

flatlander, I have no information relative to lemon oil on fretboards.  You have to draw you own conclusions.  I can only reiterate what is recommended by those who do historical preservation to fine woodwork.  I have on the other hand witnessed the damage that can be done by non drying oils and dirt accumulation to fine furniture.
  Best to you.
Thanks, I don't know what other junk is in the lemon oil you get a regular store. The wood does dry out after some time.
But I have a feeling it wouldn't make much of a difference to me what kind of oil I used for what I'm trying to achieve. Tung oil may be safer and do what I want. I'm no wood expert, but what I'm trying to do is not to make it look better or play a little easier, which are side benefits, but protect the wood from wearing down as in grooves behind the frets. It seems like dry wood would wear away faster plus less friction with oil would help. I play pretty hard and have some pretty good grooves behind frets. My new,new guitar and older recently purchased Gallagher niether have grooves and with these new guitars I truely would like to know whats best.  I do not buy that oil off of fingers is enough. Thoughts golfer or anyone? Main question being does it not make sense that an oiled fret board would wear grooves less than dry?  Who has seen damage from certain oil. Alcohol seems harsh to me even if you oil afterwards but that's just a gut feeling.
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« Reply #44 on: December 04, 2008, 12:24:05 AM »

flatlander, in that case tung oil would certainly be you best choice.  It actually harderns the wood surface because it drys.  Oil softens the survace becuae it soaks in and does not dry. 
Best wishes.
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Danny
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« Reply #45 on: December 04, 2008, 12:46:47 AM »

Why the heck not? They certanly could last that long if cared for properly.
   Yea, but will you be here too? I'm joking of course.   

I saw a post once about tung oil being used and I asked about it but the details weren't there. This sounds pretty good to me. Is Formby's Tung oil OK or is there a particular one?
              I know that Tung oil is made with different additives from various suppliers.
flatlander, in that case tung oil would certainly be you best choice.  It actually harderns the wood surface because it drys.  Oil softens the survace becuae it soaks in and does not dry. 
Best wishes.
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Michael T
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« Reply #46 on: December 04, 2008, 01:37:02 PM »

My understanding is to try to avoid any product that would have a tenancy to build up or attract and hold dust etc. on fret boards. To protect them from drying out etc really shouldn't be an issue, but with that said, I like many, believe a natural product like wood will shrink with age or wear. We all know the effects humidity can have with our instruments, or the lack there of. It stands to reason (IMO), that sealing the fret board and cleaning the build up around the frets wire, inlays etc. is just common sense for maintenance. Of course having a smooth surface aides in the comfort and playability too, plus a clean fret board looks good also.

There are lots of products available for sale that those companies want us to use regularly, it is a business after all, and most will do little if any harm when used in accordance with the directions and with discretion. The posts above have good advice in as much as oils tend to not dry thouroughly and moisture swells wood as well as attracts dust and holds contaminants. Lemon oils contain petroleum by products, citric acid and fructose sugars which may smell good and cut the crud for cleaning but certainly are going to leave residues, which in turn will require more cleaning more frequently, they likely are going to do little to seal the wood and help protect against the effects of humidity. Just my $.02.

I agree with the tung oil (purified boiled linseed oil) for use on a clean fret board. Kind of a PIA to use, but I don't think it necessary to do frequently. A very good scrub with some 000 steel wool followed by an application of high quality tung oil (like a gun stock grade-I use Birchwood Casey finish oil) followed by a light buff with the 000 steel wool will dry, harden and seal the fret board and protect it. If a high luster is desired a very light application of a hard shell finish grade floor wax could be applied too, then again applying waxes will tend to attract and hold more debris requiring more frequent cleanings. Occasional buffing with steel wool will clean the board and remove the crude in between sealings. I don't think even once a year would be needed, but I know I seem to want to do it every once in a while, just cause I can. Once a good hard seal has been applied a little steel wool buff should be all that is needed to maintain the fret board, moisture is not a good thing to be applying to fret boards regularly (IMO).
 
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flatlander
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« Reply #47 on: December 04, 2008, 02:43:02 PM »

Well after checking around on the web mainly to manufactures sites, furniture building, finishing sites, also to instrument building supply sites, and lastly to or shall I say leastly weighted, guitar forums, I have come to a definitive conclusion. Peace in the middle east and through out the world and even unknown galaxies will come 1000's of years before there is agreement on this.
 For example Tung oil remains gooey, doesn't dry out, Tung oil does dry well and hardends, is really a varnish and not for maintenance.
Quality lemon oil same. opinions and statements 180 degrees out. Leaves goo, doesn't ect.
   Also opinion that ebony is so hard, that it needs absolutely nothing.
But alas, in my travels I have made up my mind. Pure lemon oil, no distillates. Why? Well it has nothing to do with effect on wood
and that's a good start in itself. But here's the reason, and I quote:

"As an added bonus, lemon oil is an antidepressant, uplifting, and invigorating! Why not get happier when you clean? –Annie"
 If you just put "lemon oil" in search for google most of what you get is this property of lemon oil. I'll be so happy I won't care what the real answer is! Just make sure it's pure. The reports of spontaneously combusting lemon oil could quickly counter the emotionally uplifting aspects and actually add to any depression you may have. A real crash and burn.
 Seriously I may contact a violin builder and musician supplier and see what they say, or I may just huff lemon oil.



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Danny
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« Reply #48 on: December 04, 2008, 03:21:04 PM »


"As an added bonus, lemon oil is an antidepressant, uplifting, and invigorating! Why not get happier when you clean?
                              I like it
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flathead
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« Reply #49 on: December 06, 2008, 08:11:17 PM »

You might try this, I believe that it will help with cracks, helps keep fingertips soft, baby's your guitar. Try a little at first..... don't make any rash decisions. flathead

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