help with strumming!

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drathbun:
I second much of the advice here, especially about using a thin pick to begin. Strumming is all about the wrist, the wrist, the wrist.... did I say it was about the wrist? Once you get your wrist to swivel in a relaxed fluid motion, you'll be 90% there and ready to take on "Pinball Wizard". Try practicing strumming without moving your arm at the elbow at all. I know it is difficult, but if you can get your wrist turning and doing the work without the aid of your elbow, you'll be on your way.

Another aspect of good strumming is a very light hold on the pick. You'll end up being red faced with frustration  :mad:  as pick after pick go flying through the air, hitting you in the face or getting lost in the soundhole, but a light touch is everything.

As always practice practice practice  :guitar ... and  :nana_guitar

Oh and BTW... take a look at John Lennon strumming "All My Loving" on the Ed Sullivan show sometime and you'll see something truly remarkable... very very difficult strumming made to look like he could do it in his sleep. And it is ALL WRIST!

Beatles play All My Loving on Ed Sullivan in Miami (YouTube)

jeremy3220:
Quote from: drathbun on April 11, 2007, 04:39:27 PM

I second much of the advice here, especially about using a thin pick to begin. Strumming is all about the wrist, the wrist, the wrist.... did I say it was about the wrist? Once you get your wrist to swivel in a relaxed fluid motion, you'll be 90% there and ready to take on "Pinball Wizard". Try practicing strumming without moving your arm at the elbow at all. I know it is difficult, but if you can get your wrist turning and doing the work without the aid of your elbow, you'll be on your way.



I disagree. The wrist only approach is okay for playing on just a few strings. For full traditional sounding acoustic strumming you need to have your forearm going up and down. It is much easier to hit all/most strings and you get more power that way.

here's an example of strumming acoustic guitars in a 'classic' type strum.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdvjoIfGViU

tuffythepug:
Flute

I agree 100% with the suggestions by others that you use a thin pick and a fairly loose grip.   The thinner the better when you're learning strumming technique.  If you have trouble holding onto the pick with a light grip take a tiny piece of sandpaper and glue it to the top of your pick on both sides.  This will give you a non-slip grip even with light pressure. After a while you won't need that extra friction.   Strumming is all about rhythm and it doesn't necessarily come easy to many players at first.  Keep at it and you'll see improvement before long.


tuffythepug

flute:
sorry I've not got time to say cheers for the links, I'm practicing my strumming :crying:



but keep the help coming guys I'm loving the help!

drathbun:
Quote from: jeremy3220 on April 11, 2007, 05:12:48 PM

I disagree. The wrist only approach is okay for playing on just a few strings. For full traditional sounding acoustic strumming you need to have your forearm going up and down. It is much easier to hit all/most strings and you get more power that way.

here's an example of strumming acoustic guitars in a 'classic' type strum.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdvjoIfGViU




Sorry, maybe I wasn't clear... the wrist is NOT the only part of strumming but until you can get your wrist loose a forearm strum with a stiff wrist is just bad form to learn for a beginner IMO anyway... :) So I was suggesting a beginner focus on getting the wrist loose through an EXERCISE of not moving the arm.

I agree the forearm absolutely needs to move for a full traditional acoustic strum.

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