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Author Topic: Your Choice for Best internal Pickup on a DO3  (Read 1716 times)
moreguitar
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« on: September 03, 2006, 02:40:29 AM »

What would some of the more experienced amongst you recommend ??
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HangFire
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« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2006, 03:16:05 AM »

I've had pretty good luck with the K&K Pure Western in my Blackwoods.  Great natural sound, easy to install and no feedback problems!
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Larry V.
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« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2006, 03:18:14 AM »

I've owned a DV10e with the b-band dual source pickup, and omv03re with the b-band a5, and now a d03re that I just put in a K&K pure western mini.  Personally, I am very happy with the sound of the pure western.  It seems to do the best job (at least to my ears) of duplicating the sound of the guitar.
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love2play21
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« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2006, 03:25:36 AM »

I had a L.R. Baggs Imix put in my L-09 and it is incredable, i've tried other pickups in various guitars but this is by far my favorite, it is super simple and very natural sounding
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aaronjnoone
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« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2006, 01:53:58 AM »

It depends on what kind of performance you're looking for. If you want rich, woody tone, go with a dual source. In my opinion, you can't beat the sound of either a Fishman stereo blender or LR Baggs dual source. Both combine an internal mic with an undersaddle transducer. There are a lot of companies putting out multiple source pickups, these are just examples.

If you're looking for plug&play reliability without feedback, get a UST only.

If you want to be able to hear all the dynamics of your playing, including percussive beats on the soundboard, get a dual source unit. I use the LR Baggs dual source preamp. The thing you might like about this unit is that you don't have to cut your D03 for electronics. The preamp is mounted inside the body. The only drawback to this is that you have to go inside the guitar for micromanaging your sound. The upside is that you never really have to mess with it unless you choose to run stereo mode. (this requires you to run a Y cable to two channels on your PA for blending) I don't use a feedback buster and I never have problems with feedback. If you want great blending capabilities in a stereo unit, go with a Fishman Prefix Problend. It combines and blends the signals onboard the guitar and puts out a blended mono signal. You get to control the amount of mic/piezo output.

I play with a guy who has a Prefix Blend on his Taylor, and my D03 sounds every bit as good as his with the LR Baggs unit.

Hope this helps,
Aaron
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pockethero
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« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2006, 03:12:32 AM »

Get a high end Fishman on the bridge, you won`t regret it, high end being the key.
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pockethero
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« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2006, 03:17:54 AM »

did I say bridge? I meant undersaddle..peace
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dberch
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« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2006, 07:43:41 AM »

WHat is their "High End" Saddle pickup?
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sdelsolray
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« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2006, 08:27:56 PM »

What would some of the more experienced amongst you recommend ??

There is no universal "best" pickup setup.  There is, however, a pickup setup that will be "best" (or close to best) for your specific situation.  Styles of music, right hand uses and techniques, whether you are playing solo or in a band, your budget and your personal preferences all affect the answer.  Tell us a little more aboutyour situation first, and then we can help.
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dberch
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« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2006, 01:24:52 AM »

If you're looking for plug&play reliability without feedback, get a UST only.
That's a pretty strong statement, and I completely disagree.  +1 for K&K Pure Western mini (soundboard transducer). I have them on three guiitars, a Dread, an OM, and a Jumob and I've NEVER had problems with feedback that I couldn't easily control.  And I play as solo, duo, trio, and 4-piece with a full drum kit.  In doors and out. 

Also, +1 for sdesolray's statement.  The "correct" gear varies greatly for each situation.  Moreguitar, please describe the venue you will most often play in, and we'll get you some proper recommendations.

David
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aaronjnoone
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« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2006, 03:01:33 AM »

Quote
That's a pretty strong statement, and I completely disagree.  +1 for K&K Pure Western mini (soundboard transducer). I have them on three guiitars, a Dread, an OM, and a Jumob and I've NEVER had problems with feedback that I couldn't easily control.  And I play as solo, duo, trio, and 4-piece with a full drum kit.  In doors and out.

You don't think a UST is realiable and not prone to feedback?

If you read my entire post you'll see I go on to say that I have a LR Baggs dual source (UST/Mic) and I have no feedback problems. I don't think anyone disagrees with the fact that UST's are a lot less likely to feedback in high volume situations. And correct me if I'm wrong, but there's no microphone in the Pure Western, right? As I understand it, a transducer is less prone to feedback than an internal mic. I've never tried a soundboard transducer, though. Not trying to start an argument, but I think you misenterpreted what I'm trying to say.

If you're a beginner and you want to start playing, a UST is easy to use in a variety of situations. If I had started off with a dual source unit, I think I would've had a lot of problems when I first started playing solo gigs and running my own sound.



The statements I make (made) are based on my own experience and that of fellow musicians I gig with now and have gigged with in the past and are not meant to be interpreted as expert advice.

I do not know it all.

Aaron
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dberch
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« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2006, 03:17:47 AM »

You are quite right, Aaron.  Forgive me for a poorly worded post.  You are also right that there is no microphone with the K&K Pure Western.  Their dual source system with micrpohone is called the Trinity.  I don't feel I need a on board mic - the pickups sound plenty natrual without one.  I guess I was reacting to my percpeption that you were saying ONLY UST's are NOT prone to feedback. My perceptions have been wrong before, and may have just been wrong again.  I'm not the best communicator.  :<>

I love my K&K's and I'm a bit sensitive to generalized statements that seem to indicate they are feedback prone.  My certainly are not. 

No hard feelings I hope.  Can I buy you a beer?   

David
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aaronjnoone
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« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2006, 03:29:39 AM »

Yes, I would love a beer. Thanks David.

 


Edit: I should've just said get a transducer.
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