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Author Topic: How do you maintain humidity?  (Read 2275 times)
noonantx
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« on: August 28, 2006, 06:43:50 PM »

I just bought a D-09 and am concerned about the humiduty level in my home? Do any of you check in to this, and if so, how do you measure and maintain humidity?
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ronmac
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« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2006, 07:01:27 PM »

There is a great section on the Larrivee website dealing with humidity: http://www.larrivee.com/flash/features/education/humidity/humidity.html


Welcome to the Forum, and congratulations on getting a great guitar!
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Ron

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« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2006, 07:18:56 PM »

 afro

Buy a digital Hydrometer immediately.  About $20 for a good one.  It depends on where you live.  If you live in floridia (lets say) you won't have do much if anything and if you live in New York for example, You are gonna do a lot of humidifying during winter
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Queequeg
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« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2006, 07:21:12 PM »

or a 'hygrometer'. digital about $40.00
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inspector13
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« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2006, 07:31:09 PM »

I am assuming, from your email address, that you are in Dallas. I live a little south of you. I, as many others, am using a digital hydrometer. In the winter you will definitely need to humidify. I humidify my music room. Most of the summer will be dry enough to require added moisture as well. In the summer I use a Dampit and keep guitars in the case. This is what works for me. Good luck
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noonantx
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« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2006, 07:52:34 PM »

OK I live in a 2,000 sqft home in Dallas. Is there a machine that will maintain humidity for the entire house?

Thanks...
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Steve
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« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2006, 07:57:47 PM »

Welcome to the forum noonantx.

I agree you should get a hygrometer ASAP.  This will let you know what is going on in your guitar case.  Read up on controlling humidity on the Larrivée site and if you have more questions we can give you more info.

There are two ways to humidify your guitar in the case, or the entire room.  The cheapest way is to just control the humidity in your guitar case.  Planet Waves makes a small digital sensor and a sound hole humidifier that works good.  

The next way is to humidify the entire room that the guitar is stored in.  There are a number of room humidifiers available, I use two Hunter models and keep my entire house and music room between 40%~50% Relative Humidity.  2000' is a lot for one of these units.  They make units that can be attached to a furnace but they cost plenty.  You may be better to just humidify one room where you store your guitar.

Steve
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Steve
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« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2006, 08:21:13 PM »

One more thing.

Those Planet Waves sensors and sound hole humidifiers are on sale right now w/ free shipping at Music123.  Great deal if anyone is looking for one of these combos for winter. :GRN>
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inspector13
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« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2006, 09:24:48 PM »

You can get whole house units that will attached to your HVAC system but are not often found or are necessary in North Texas (I own a home inspection company that services DFW area) and can be pricey. During the summer you do not want to humidify your whole house or even a room. The increased humidity will make your house feel warmer and I know you don't want that in Texas. You can find units at the Home Depot/Lowe's type stores that should keep up with the moisture needs for your home in Dallas during the winter. These units will also make your home feel more confortable during the winter. But the in case humidifier is the type you want for summer and can easily take care of your winter needs as well. Hope this helps clearifs things somewhat.
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noonantx
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« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2006, 09:43:11 PM »

Thanks to everyone! I owned a Martin DC-16 for several years and made no attempt to maintain humidity, but I will with this  :wacko:one. I had no problems with the Martin. I traded it in and was considered in near mint condition...
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drathbun
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« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2006, 11:29:08 PM »

I used to use the PlanetWaves soundhole humidifier but once you get past two or three guitars it becomes a labour intensive proposition. You also don't get more than two seasons out of the soundhold humidifier even when you use distilled water. Plus you have to keep your guitars in their cases! Humidifying the whole house to the level needed to maintain my guitars in the winter causes windows to condense and sweat and cause warpage on wood frames.

So I decided to humidify just my music room/recording studio/office with a warm mist humidifier. I've had it for two winter seasons so far and it works beautifully and is low maintenance.

Here is the unit I'm talking about:



They run about $50. You take the easy carry water tank and fill it with distilled water and just drop it back into place. Set it to 45% RH and just keep filling it when it needs water. If the RH dips below your setting it turns on. The only maintenance I do is to clean the immersion heater element once every two weeks (during heavy use months). That's easy too! Just throw a switch and the top of the unit comes off. Pour some CLR into the bottom pan and let it sit for five or ten minutes. Rinse and replace the water.

It IS important to use distilled water if you are in a hard water area or you'll get a fine powder deposited on everything in the room! I have a water distiller as well so the "making" of water is easy.
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LookingForLarri
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« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2006, 05:52:21 AM »

One more thing.

Those Planet Waves sensors and sound hole humidifiers are on sale right now w/ free shipping at Music123.  Great deal if anyone is looking for one of these combos for winter. :GRN>

Here is the link, great product

http://music123.com/Planet-Waves-Humidifier-and-Control-Sensor-Combo-Pack-i125360.music

  PBJT
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JohnM2001
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« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2006, 10:21:35 AM »

Heres a NOT SO GOOD way     Like a Letterman thing...will it float??

See the incredible floating guitar




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« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2006, 10:00:26 PM »

You can always move to the UK  we have plenty humidity !  I got quite excited a couple of months back when my hygrometer actually dipped 1% below its 42% trigger level...... then rushed to refill my soundhole humidifier and seal my precious "Billie" in her case with it.... :rolleyes:
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inspector13
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« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2006, 11:01:35 PM »

My hydrometer in my Texas home today is at 35% (typical), but my guitars are happy in the cases.
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