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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 325377 times)
Danny
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« Reply #1860 on: April 10, 2016, 03:26:03 PM »

   The HBO series The Pacific is a companion to The Band of Brothers. One follows the army with its conquest of Germany, while the other is about the Marines fighting Japan across the Pacific.
    Two books were relied on for the Pacific, Helmut for my Pillow by Robert Leckie  and With the Old Breed at Peleliu and Okinawa by E. B. Sledge. Both of these men are featured prominently in the HBO series.
     I've read Helmut for my Pillow and it is excellent. Now I'm reading With the Old Breed. It is also excellent, with a different flavor. Eugene Sledge took notes as he fought in the war, Robert Leckie was a writer and a good one. Eugene Sledge gives us an ongoing slide show of what it was like to be on the front line, with all the physical, psychological and lasting spiritual effects on a sensitive man fighting in conditions none of us can even imagine.
      I can't recommend this book highly enough, if you desire the truth about our young men defending freedom against the vilest of oppressers.
            These men deserve to be remembered and thanked for their extreme sacrifice.
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« Reply #1861 on: April 10, 2016, 09:14:14 PM »

Delighting in the Trinity  by  Michael Reeves....

Trying to ge a beter understanding about this....  BobW
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Caleb
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« Reply #1862 on: May 15, 2016, 01:40:28 PM »

I recently finished Slash's autobiography.  It has some interesting bits about the early days of GNR, which is why I wanted to read it.  Not fine literature by any stretch, but a pretty fun read for someone who grew up in the 80s. 
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Mikeymac
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« Reply #1863 on: May 24, 2016, 03:09:01 AM »

Currently reading two excellent books:

American Contempt for Liberty by economist Walter E. Williams  This is a compilation of some of William's editorial columns from about 2009 - present, addressing the economy, politicians (whom Williams generally has a very low opinion of!) and whether the United States will survive our current economic, cultural and political malaise. He makes it very clear we've moved far from the beliefs and understandings the Founding Fathers had for the Constitution and our Bill of Rights ... which has translated into a contempt for liberty and our personal greed and selfishness when it comes to expecting the government to take care of us from cradle to grave - at the expense of other taxpayers.

Muslim Mafia: Inside the Secret Underworld That's Conspiring to Islamize America by P. David Gaubatz and Paul Sperry (forward by Congresswoman Sue Myrick) 
One of the authors was able to infiltrate the Council for American Islamic Relations (CAIR) and document the fact that it is just a front organization for the Muslim Brotherhood, and it works with many mosques and imams around the US to support terrorism. Even though this book was published in 2010, it is powerful and still very relevant today. Much of the information obtained by the authors has helped convince the FBI and the US government that CAIR is involved directly in funding and sponsoring terrorism, and they have lost much of the access and relationship they used to enjoy with the government. Unfortunately, the American media has chosen to ignore much of this vital information.

I'll stop there, in order not to get this post deleted or thread blocked.
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Caleb
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« Reply #1864 on: May 25, 2016, 02:23:03 PM »

RAVE ON: THE BIOGRAPHY OF BUDDY HOLLY by Philip Norman.
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #1865 on: May 25, 2016, 03:27:53 PM »

Just finished the ninth book in the Longmire series by Craig Johnson, A Serpent's Tooth. Love Walt and Henry. Way better than the TV show. Boy Howdy! 
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« Reply #1866 on: May 31, 2016, 01:38:21 AM »

Just finished the ninth book in the Longmire series by Craig Johnson, A Serpent's Tooth. Love Walt and Henry. Way better than the TV show. Boy Howdy! 

 +1

I discovered Craig Johnson's Longmire late, through a radio interview.

Part of that interview was about transferring the characters to the screen and his involvement in that process.

Throughout the interview, Johnson was so "up" it was all I could do not to run down to the library and kick through the front doors (the interview was on a Sunday morning show -   http://www.cbc.ca/player/play/2311544178  and even in canukistan, most libraries are closed on Sundays)

The novels are better for sure, but the show's no slouch, and getting better with each season.

Story telling in print is very different from story telling on screen - people really cue off of totally different things - and that was part of what made Johnson's interview so interesting: there are very major differences in the character relationships between the novel and the screen, yet the screen version still works amazingly well. But the novels definitley have far more depth, detail, humour, and resonance.

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Danny
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« Reply #1867 on: May 31, 2016, 02:38:04 PM »

+1

I discovered Craig Johnson's Longmire late, through a radio interview.

Part of that interview was about transferring the characters to the screen and his involvement in that process.

Throughout the interview, Johnson was so "up" it was all I could do not to run down to the library and kick through the front doors (the interview was on a Sunday morning show -   http://www.cbc.ca/player/play/2311544178  and even in canukistan, most libraries are closed on Sundays)

The novels are better for sure, but the show's no slouch, and getting better with each season.

Story telling in print is very different from story telling on screen - people really cue off of totally different things - and that was part of what made Johnson's interview so interesting: there are very major differences in the character relationships between the novel and the screen, yet the screen version still works amazingly well. But the novels definitley have far more depth, detail, humour, and resonance.


Well  said, I have read all his books in the Longmire series, except the latest. The tv (Netflix) series is done very well also. I just hate the long wait between seasons.
    As ducktrapper said the books are better than the tv stuff.

I have only a few pages left in "WITH THE OLD BREED by E.B.SLEDGE" At Peleliu and Okinawa. This book is simply a first hand report of a marine who survived two of our most costly struggles with the Japanese, under the worst conditions imagined. He and only a small group of K/3/5 survived those horror filled times.
     These kind of history books help me never to forget the price paid for freedom in distant bloody battle fields, the fallen and the ones who returned. Some with major physical problems, but all with memories that haunt them all their days. Though some do aquire peace and inward healing, but still grieve for the buddies they fought with side by side but fell on some distant shore.
     Brothers in arms...
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Caleb
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« Reply #1868 on: August 05, 2016, 12:00:21 AM »

Dan,
Jocko Willink on his excellent podcast has reviewed "Old Breed" and it sounds great.  He also reviewed "The Forgotten Highlander," a memoir of a Scottish soldier POW in the Pacific.  The passages he read sent me to Amazon to order a copy.  I've not read it yet but I will.  Have you read this one (sorry I didn't look back through the thread)?

I'm in the middle of THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF RONALD REAGAN.
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #1869 on: August 05, 2016, 12:24:39 PM »

"Witness" by Whittaker Chambers. Anyone with information or an opinion about communism, the black list, witch hunts, McCarthyism etc. based solely on the word of Hollywood movies like "Trumbo" and the likes of Pete Seeger needs to read it. As it says in the forward, "Chambers went to hell but he did not return empty handed".
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Danny
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« Reply #1870 on: August 05, 2016, 02:17:19 PM »

Dan,
Jocko Willink on his excellent podcast has reviewed "Old Breed" and it sounds great.  He also reviewed "The Forgotten Highlander," a memoir of a Scottish soldier POW in the Pacific.  The passages he read sent me to Amazon to order a copy.  I've not read it yet but I will.  Have you read this one (sorry I didn't look back through the thread)?

I'm in the middle of THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF RONALD REAGAN.
I haven't read The Fogotten Highlander, I'll put it on my list, thanks for the heads up.
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« Reply #1871 on: August 11, 2016, 04:40:03 PM »

"Witness" by Whittaker Chambers. Anyone with information or an opinion about communism, the black list, witch hunts, McCarthyism etc. based solely on the word of Hollywood movies like "Trumbo" and the likes of Pete Seeger needs to read it. As it says in the forward, "Chambers went to hell but he did not return empty handed".

I started Witness several years ago (when I first got a Kindle); need to go back and finish it.

Recently finished American Contempt for Liberty by Walter Williams. It's a compilation of his newspaper columns from the past few years, so there's some repetition, but he does a great job of clearing away the foggy thinking that has taken over in economics, education, politics and social issues (like "diversity") in modern times. Whether you agree with him or not (and I almost always do), he will make you think about your assumptions.
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« Reply #1872 on: August 11, 2016, 11:11:41 PM »

I have been a fan of Walter Williams for about 30 years since I heard him on a talk radio show. I have been reading his articles ever since. I may have to pick up that book just to have the collection.
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« Reply #1873 on: August 12, 2016, 12:13:57 AM »

I am reading Body of Divinity by Thomas Watson.  He was a Puritan minister in the 1600's.  Not everyone's cup of tea, but I am enjoying it one sip at a time.
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« Reply #1874 on: August 12, 2016, 08:25:26 AM »

Just finished listening to "The Finish, the killing of Osama Bin Laden" by Mark Bowden on my plane ride to Texas yesterday.

This is an interesting story about one of the most complex and controversial events in American and world history. This covers events and the backstory that occurred over and behind the scenes of three presidencies.
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« Reply #1875 on: August 13, 2016, 05:04:00 AM »

The Pursuit of God by A.W. Tozer (maybe my fifth time through)

Comeback by Louie Giglio

Why You Love Music by John Powell

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« Reply #1876 on: August 21, 2016, 02:00:43 PM »

I've read "Pursuit" by Tozer several times.  I think he wrote it by hand on a single train ride.  I always thought that was pretty neat.

I'm reading:

THE FORGOTTEN HIGHLANDER by Alistair Urquhart - a Scottish POW in the Pacific.  Horrific, horrible, awful and other such words completely fail to capture what this fellow and his fellows went through in this prison camp. 

HOLE IN THE SKY by William Kittredge - a memoir from 1992 I found randomly from an American writer I've never heard of.  It's about his growing up on a ranch in Oregon.  I'm only one chapter in so far and it's very whimsical.  I like the style but it took me a page or two to get the hang of the flow. 
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« Reply #1877 on: August 25, 2016, 06:53:19 PM »

Just finished "An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth" by Chris Hatfield. It's a great insight into what it takes to get into space and the challenges that come with the job. He also plays a Larrivee so there's that too. Loved the book.
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Caleb
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« Reply #1878 on: October 06, 2016, 02:14:07 PM »

Been on a reading kick about the war on terror in Iraq/Afghanistan.  

Just finished up:
FEARLESS by Eric Blehm - a book about fallen SEAL Adam Brown.  This guy overcame some serious obstacles.  
LIONS OF KANDAHAR by Mjr Rusty Bradley - the story of one crazy battle.  Unbelievable what these guys go through.

Currently reading:
THE RED CIRCLE by Brandon Webb - a SEAL team guy and trainer of their snipers.  Excellent so far.  
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Caleb
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« Reply #1879 on: October 07, 2016, 11:58:34 PM »

RED CIRCLE was great. 

On deck now:

AMERICAN SNIPER by Chris Kyle.  I saw the film last year and was pretty blown away.  His death was so pointless and tragic.  About 1/3 into the book.  Great so far.
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