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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 324743 times)
eded
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« Reply #1700 on: August 21, 2014, 11:28:07 PM »

I'm thinking of doing this one via audiobook.  Have you read any other bios on Cash?  I'm wondering where a good place to start is.

It's my first Cash bio.  Apparently thee have been several and at least one autobiography.  I think this is the newest.

Ed
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Caleb
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« Reply #1701 on: August 21, 2014, 11:57:32 PM »

Thanks. 

I think Cash did an autobio pretty early on and another later. 
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Mikeymac
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« Reply #1702 on: August 22, 2014, 04:31:01 PM »

Another Johnny Cash bio is The Man Called Cash: The Life, Love, and Faith of an American Legend It's promoted as "The Authorized Biography. It was a good read - I knew a fair amount about Cash (no expert for sure) and this book filled in a lot of places. I think it paints a pretty accurate picture of Cash the saint and the sinner.
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Caleb
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« Reply #1703 on: August 22, 2014, 09:51:00 PM »

Another Johnny Cash bio is The Man Called Cash: The Life, Love, and Faith of an American Legend It's promoted as "The Authorized Biography. It was a good read - I knew a fair amount about Cash (no expert for sure) and this book filled in a lot of places. I think it paints a pretty accurate picture of Cash the saint and the sinner.

Excellent, and thank you. 
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« Reply #1704 on: August 22, 2014, 10:10:18 PM »

Another Johnny Cash bio is The Man Called Cash: The Life, Love, and Faith of an American Legend It's promoted as "The Authorized Biography. It was a good read - I knew a fair amount about Cash (no expert for sure) and this book filled in a lot of places. I think it paints a pretty accurate picture of Cash the saint and the sinner.

Just added it to my Goodreads 'to read' list.

By the way to all readers of the thread - Goodreads.com is like a giant version of this giant thread.  I don't get spam from it as far as I can tell.  I know a few of the thread contributors have joined Goodreads as a result of this thread.
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« Reply #1705 on: August 24, 2014, 07:38:50 PM »

I just reread Steinbeck's The Pearl. Currently, I'm finishing up a book by Rick Bass called Colter that he wrote about his favorite hunting dog.
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« Reply #1706 on: August 24, 2014, 08:58:47 PM »

Haven't read The Pearl in years.  "It was the cry of death." That line and that scene have never left me.
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« Reply #1707 on: August 24, 2014, 09:09:51 PM »

Haven't read The Pearl in years.  "It was the cry of death." That line and that scene have never left me.

Yes. It's powerful stuff. I said to my wife that rereading it sort of reset my moral compass.  I want to go back and revisit more Steinbeck.
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« Reply #1708 on: August 24, 2014, 10:57:56 PM »

Currently reading The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt.  Long  book.  Started out quite well, and continues to be good, but I'm in the middle of a section of young teen debauchery which I would love to exit.  I flipped forward to see if we return to more inspirational humanity, and I'm hopeful.

Meanwhile, The Pearl sounds like a good book to revisit if only for its profundity and brevity.  Those two are a very good combination in both literature and oratory.
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Caleb
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« Reply #1709 on: August 25, 2014, 03:30:07 AM »

Steinbeck's 'Red Pony' is another great and very short work. 
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Danny
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« Reply #1710 on: August 28, 2014, 06:01:00 PM »

Just finished the fifth book in the Longmire mysteries, Dark Horse. Couldn't give a higher recommendation. Best of the five so far and they're all good. 
After reading this post I tried to remember what this book was about. I couldn't pin it down so I looked for the book on my shelf. Long story short I had never read the whole book. Only the first chapter in a sample.

      I thought that I had read all the Longmire Mystery books. I was very happy when it dawned on me that one book was left. So I'm on chapter four now.
             Thanks Tom
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« Reply #1711 on: August 28, 2014, 07:57:01 PM »

Just started Stars & Strikes: Baseball and America in the Bicentennial Summer of '76   http://www.amazon.com/Stars-Strikes-Baseball-America-Bicentennial/dp/1250034388

This is the year I started paying more attention to baseball.  I was a kid in Detroit area, and Mark Fidrych "The Bird" was the star of the Tigers that year.  Known more for his crazy on-mound antics than anything else, that grabbed my attention - that and John Wockenfuss' odd batting stance which all of us kids tried to emulate.  I started collecting baseball cards, but not really knowing what to do with them other than use them to make motor sounds on my bike.  The next year Tito Fuentes started playing for the Tigers and he was cool because he bounced the bat off home plate as part of his routine.  Can you tell I didn't really understand the strategy and athleticism of the game, just the oddities?

Anyways, this is so far a pretty great read - particularly so if you are a fan of baseball and pop-culture.
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« Reply #1712 on: August 29, 2014, 05:24:14 AM »

I thought that I had read all the Longmire Mystery books. I was very happy when it dawned on me that one book was left. So I'm on chapter four now.   Thanks Tom

Usually I try to "read" stories before I "watch" them, but I heard Craig Johnson interviewed just as the TV series was about to premiere. His attitude to moving his ideas from book to screen was so positive that I wound up watching the TV version before reading anything. Even with the non-sequitur of "Starbuck v2" as a Wyoming Deputy it's great.

Apparently the TV version has been "dropped". Longmire TV Series

So now I have to read the books!
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« Reply #1713 on: August 29, 2014, 12:56:36 PM »

Usually I try to "read" stories before I "watch" them, but I heard Craig Johnson interviewed just as the TV series was about to premiere. His attitude to moving his ideas from book to screen was so positive that I wound up watching the TV version before reading anything. Even with the non-sequitur of "Starbuck v2" as a Wyoming Deputy it's great.

Apparently the TV version has been "dropped". Longmire TV Series

So now I have to read the books!
The books take a different line than the tv series. I hadn't heard that it was dropped on tv.
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« Reply #1714 on: August 29, 2014, 01:18:21 PM »

I started out watching the series and enjoying it immensely but, after reading Johnson's books, it's been spoiled for me. The characters and stories are much better in print.
You're welcome Dan! 
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Caleb
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« Reply #1715 on: September 04, 2014, 04:23:41 AM »

I've spent the past several months working my way through The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas.  I finished today.   This book comes out of a truly brilliant mind.  I'm honestly sad it's over since I've spent so many hours with it.  This is possibly the most complex story I've ever read.  There are tons of characters (kind of hard to keep up with, honestly), and how someone wove such a thing together is truly a thing of wonder.  Dumas must've been a genius.  

Side note:  I "read" this one via Librivox audiobook.  If you ever decide to give it a shot, go with version 3, a solo reading by a fellow called David Clarke.  He's an Englishman who does possibly the best job I've ever heard in an audiobook, and I listen to 40 or 50 of them a year, many by professional actors.  The guy gives an absolutely fantastic performance.  
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« Reply #1716 on: September 05, 2014, 07:54:24 PM »

creature,

Re: The Count of Monte Cristo...was it hard to get into due to the many characters?  I wanted to like War and Peace, but just couldn't and the character count had a lot to do with it.  How far into the book did you get before you got hooked?
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Caleb
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« Reply #1717 on: September 05, 2014, 09:12:06 PM »

creature,

Re: The Count of Monte Cristo...was it hard to get into due to the many characters?  I wanted to like War and Peace, but just couldn't and the character count had a lot to do with it.  How far into the book did you get before you got hooked?
Yes, there are lots of characters in Monte Cristo, and some whose names change as the story progresses.  It was a little tough to keep up with some of them, especially being an American and all the names French.  I never got totally lost in it all though, and this was after putting the book down for about three months when my work schedule no longer allowed me audiobook time during that period.  

I'll say this, Monte Cristo, in the first 15 chapters or so, was some of the best reading I've ever done.  It does lull somewhat for about 50 or 60 chapters, never to the point of boredom, but Dumas takes a lot of time developing this complex story.  The pace quickens for the last 10 or so chapters and finishes very strong. I believe there are 117 chapters total.

I cannot recommend enough David Clarke's reading on Librivox.  

I've not yet attempted War and Peace.  Someday.  I did walk away from Anna Karenina.  The Russian names especially completely threw me off, and the reader on Librivox read way too fast for my liking.  I might try it again someday, either in print or with a different  reader.
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #1718 on: September 05, 2014, 09:27:42 PM »

Well if you think Monte Cristo is difficult, War and Peace should be fun. Half way through, I started over once I realized that everyone had three interchangeable names. Oh those Russians! Dostoevsky is great too. Try The Brothers Karamazov, Crime and Punishment  or The Idiot.   
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« Reply #1719 on: September 05, 2014, 11:27:11 PM »

Thanks, creature.  I'll put it on the list.  Duck, I read The Brothers Karamazov and loved it.  The multiple names for each character took a little effort, but what stunning plot development with depth of metaphor and meaning that I haven't matched in the literature I've read.  Crime and Punishment, good but not on the same level--even if the high schools of America would rather teach it.  I thought I'd like The Idiot, but I put it down, maybe too soon.
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