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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 310953 times)
redwards
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« Reply #1500 on: July 23, 2013, 02:04:28 AM »

I've been traveling through Asheville, N.C. a few times over the several years and have Thomas Wolfe on my "to read" list. They may be moving up the list...

I currently have probably 10 books physically sitting in my in my queue...it may be a little while.
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« Reply #1501 on: July 23, 2013, 03:37:49 AM »

For those who haven't joined Goodreads, it's basically this thread x millions  - a social network for book readers.  I've found some interesting reading material through connections on Goodreads.

I just started "Hallucinations" by Oliver Sacks.  Finishing up "The Path to Rome" by Hilaire Belloc.  In the pile on the nightstand are: "Men to Move My Mountains" by Irving Stone (it sits there in intimidating thickness still - I have read the first chapter, a single page), "The Racketeer" by John Grisham, and maybe one more I can't remember.  These are due back to the library in about a week.

-Scott
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« Reply #1502 on: July 23, 2013, 04:02:02 AM »

For those who haven't joined Goodreads, it's basically this thread x millions  - a social network for book readers.  I've found some interesting reading material through connections on Goodreads.

I just started "Hallucinations" by Oliver Sacks.  Finishing up "The Path to Rome" by Hilaire Belloc.  In the pile on the nightstand are: "Men to Move My Mountains" by Irving Stone (it sits there in intimidating thickness still - I have read the first chapter, a single page), "The Racketeer" by John Grisham, and maybe one more I can't remember.  These are due back to the library in about a week.

-Scott
Tell me about Belloc's book, please.
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« Reply #1503 on: July 23, 2013, 12:56:25 PM »

Yes, Thomas Wolfe, have to look into that next.  Kesey is great too.  I should read Sometimes a Great Notion too.  One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is one of my favourite books too. 
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« Reply #1504 on: July 23, 2013, 01:28:05 PM »

Tell me about Belloc's book, please.

I'm not quite done with it.  He is now in Italy, and basically on the home stretch.  I'll admit that my pace in reading the book somewhat matches his pace along the path and when the weather turns sour and he doesn't meet interesting people, my interest in reading slows.

Reading it reminds me of why the Swiss are the way that they are.  One can become completely lost in a parallel world of beauty and peace while in the Alps in Switzerland, forgetting the cares of the rest of the world while drinking in postcard-worthy scene after scene.

Definitely worthwhile reading.  A clever literary device runs throughout the book - a running dialog between the Lector and the Auctor - commentary on the story from observers - not unlike Mystery Science Theatre 3000.  All in all, this is another older author that I would have liked to known personally.  I can imagine peacefully passing away the hours in deep conversation with Belloc in some low-ceiling pub in the UK, on a weekly basis; walking the 15 minutes home to some cottage, slightly woozy from the beer and mental workout, with a smile on my face.

Howzat for a review?
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« Reply #1505 on: July 23, 2013, 01:59:35 PM »

I'm not quite done with it.  He is now in Italy, and basically on the home stretch.  I'll admit that my pace in reading the book somewhat matches his pace along the path and when the weather turns sour and he doesn't meet interesting people, my interest in reading slows.

Reading it reminds me of why the Swiss are the way that they are.  One can become completely lost in a parallel world of beauty and peace while in the Alps in Switzerland, forgetting the cares of the rest of the world while drinking in postcard-worthy scene after scene.

Definitely worthwhile reading.  A clever literary device runs throughout the book - a running dialog between the Lector and the Auctor - commentary on the story from observers - not unlike Mystery Science Theatre 3000.  All in all, this is another older author that I would have liked to known personally.  I can imagine peacefully passing away the hours in deep conversation with Belloc in some low-ceiling pub in the UK, on a weekly basis; walking the 15 minutes home to some cottage, slightly woozy from the beer and mental workout, with a smile on my face.

Howzat for a review?
Beautifully written.  Thank you!
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« Reply #1506 on: August 02, 2013, 05:01:40 PM »

This Country of Ours - H.E. Marshall   
Old American history book.  Skims and hits highlights.  60 or so short chapters.  Perfect for those who didn't pay attn in school but should have.  Free on Librivox.org and done by a wonderful reader. 
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« Reply #1507 on: August 04, 2013, 08:03:38 PM »

Just finished "Forged: Writing in the Name of God" by Bart D. Erhman.  Currently re-reading "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins so I can start books 2 and 3 and just started "The Devil in the White City" by Erik Larson.
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« Reply #1508 on: August 05, 2013, 12:15:41 AM »

Just finished "THE HILLIKER CURSE" by James Ellroy, author of LA Confidential and Black Dahlia and many others. It's an autobiographical sketch how his mother's murder when he was 9 messed up his relationships with women and drove his life.
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« Reply #1509 on: August 05, 2013, 04:56:49 AM »

About 1/2-way through "Hallucinations" by Oliver Sacks.  Sacks is a favorite author of mine.  This one hasn't disappointed so far.
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« Reply #1510 on: August 14, 2013, 12:13:34 AM »

                    CURRAHEE!
I just finished this book for the second time.. Stephen E. Ambrose said this was...by a long shot the best... of the combat books from both world wars. Written by a man who was 18 when he entered the 101st Airborne and parachuted into France on D day. Donald R. Burgett
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« Reply #1511 on: August 14, 2013, 04:54:21 PM »

Rereading THE DRAGON'S TOOTH by N.D. Wilson.  Fun fiction. 
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« Reply #1512 on: August 15, 2013, 02:37:11 AM »

                   CURRAHEE!
I just finished this book for the second time.. Stephen E. Ambrose said this was...by a long shot the best... of the combat books from both world wars. Written by a man who was 18 when he entered the 101st Airborne and parachuted into France on D day. Donald R. Burgett

I know it ain't "reading" but I just finished watching Band of Brothers for the 5th or 6th time. Kind of a summer tradition. So damned good!
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« Reply #1513 on: August 15, 2013, 03:48:25 PM »

I know it ain't "reading" but I just finished watching Band of Brothers for the 5th or 6th time. Kind of a summer tradition. So damned good!
Well you got me started through again as well. The book BAND OF BROTHERS is better than the series though. Stephen E. Ambrose just knew how to write in a way to put you in the scene itself. As much as that is possible by words alone.
       "We're paratroopers, we're supposed to be surrounded" Captain Dick Winters, (Bastogne)
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
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« Reply #1514 on: August 15, 2013, 06:55:02 PM »

"We were down to one round per man..." SGT. Malarkey in Bastogne.   It is hard to realize the 101st really thwarted Hitlers best, with almost nothing.
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« Reply #1515 on: August 16, 2013, 12:52:59 AM »

You guys have gone and done it. Rereading AND watching "Band of Brothers". The wings that were pinned on me in 1979 jumped in Normandy and Holland on my uncle's chest.... Airborne, All the way!
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« Reply #1516 on: August 16, 2013, 02:15:24 AM »

You guys have gone and done it. Rereading AND watching "Band of Brothers". The wings that were pinned on me in 1979 jumped in Normandy and Holland on my uncle's chest.... Airborne, All the way!
Such an honor.
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« Reply #1517 on: August 18, 2013, 11:24:20 PM »

I'm enjoying David Mamet's deconstruction of modern left/liberalism, The Secret Knowledge. Recommended.  

I'm nearly 2/3's the way through The Secret Knowledge: On The Dismantling of American Culture. Thanks for the recommendation. Mamet has produced a blisteringly incisive encapsulation of a mindset not oriented towards objective realty.
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« Reply #1518 on: August 19, 2013, 01:32:06 AM »

Yes, Thomas Wolfe, have to look into that next.  Kesey is great too.  I should read Sometimes a Great Notion too.  One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is one of my favourite books too.  

I definitely think Notion is one of the great American novels and couldn't recommend it more highly. It is a book that confuses the crap out of Liberals, however. How could Merry Prankster Kesey, the head acid head, create a hero like Hank Stamper? The conflict between Hank and his brother Leland is very well conceived and I think it may have changed my life.  

As for Cuckoos Nest, I actually preferred the movie.

I started reading Richard Dawkins' The God Delusion down in Wisconsin but now I have to find my own copy. It's interesting, to say the least.
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« Reply #1519 on: August 19, 2013, 01:35:32 AM »

Well you got me started through again as well. The book BAND OF BROTHERS is better than the series though. Stephen E. Ambrose just knew how to write in a way to put you in the scene itself. As much as that is possible by words alone.
       "We're paratroopers, we're supposed to be surrounded" Captain Dick Winters, (Bastogne)

One of the greatest retorts in military history. Right up there with the more concise, "Nuts."
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