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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 324779 times)
Niteshooter
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« Reply #1440 on: February 24, 2013, 06:01:00 AM »

Just finished, Taylor Guitars 30 Years of a New American Classic by Michael John Simmons. Best quote in the book by Bob Taylor, "I think Jean Larrivee is one of the best guitar makers alive". Also lots of interesting historical data including how Jean Larrivee helped out Taylor in the very beginning and how they have remained friends since.
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ffinke
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« Reply #1441 on: February 27, 2013, 03:29:52 AM »

Haven't read a good novel in a while so picked up Stephen King's "Hearts in Atlantis"... page turner for sure.
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« Reply #1442 on: February 27, 2013, 06:04:55 PM »

A Quaker Book of Wisdom: Life Lessons In Simplicity, Service, And Common Sense
by Robert Lawrence Smith

VERY much enjoying this little book of late.  I tend to lean toward common sense and this book is filled with it.  And not much religion to speak of, if that bugs you.   Mostly just a book about keeping it simple. 
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flatlander
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« Reply #1443 on: February 27, 2013, 06:09:15 PM »

I'll freely admit I don't read enough and when I do it's usually about music or musicians.
I just finished Blind Owl Blues. I have always been a Canned Heat fan since early teens and been listening a lot lately as I work on learning slide in my old age.
The book revealed that the things I knew about Alan Wilson we're right but much more to the extreme than I realized.
I knew he played with some old blues guys in early 60's. I did not know that he was in the middle of the "rediscovery" of Artist such as John Hurt, Son House, Bukka White, Skip James and more.
And he not only played with all of them when they were in Boston, but they stayed with him and he interviewed all of them. He had already notated a bunch of thier music and went to great detail to get correct tuning and neck position. Son House was a mess when he first popped up. Alcohol. Could only play the simplist guitar (which he didn't even own own at time) Alan spent a couple weeks teaching Son his own songs back much to Sons delight and Son started getting himslef back together. A couple players got quite aggrivated by Wilson (who was very mild mannered and respectful) because he had learned thier stuff so well, studied it thoroughly. Skip James not pleased. He asked John Fayhey to come to his house and give him a lesson. When he got there he found Alan with all of Johns songs laying there notated in standard and tab and all he wanted was to fill in a couple places where he had questions! Fahey said it made him angry because he didn't think anyone could figure out how he did it. He's the one that took Alan to L.A. so he could help him do his thesis which required much notation. All this was while Wilson was 19 or 20.  So very, very smart and dedicated.
 I knew he was "wierd" but didn't realize how wierd and depressed he was. But no matter how depressed he was nothing seemed to affect his music. Just those perfect licks, not overdone. Same with drugs, didn't seem to affect his seriousness about music or ability to play. Save perhaps Woodstock where they took healthy doses before going on stage. But Bob Hite suggested only that it messed up his singing.
 I knew he was into nature. Again didn't realize how much. He documented tree's and had thousands of leaves and such saved and labeled with proper name. Part his his depression was due to pollution and man destroying earth. He never owned a house, although they made good money, usually slept outside in a sleeping bag. Even when on tour. He didn't usually get a room. Lived out of his van. In LA often slept in Hite's back yard up Topango Canyon. (where he was when they found body)
 So different kind of guy to say the least. If you're a Canned Heat fan know that while Bob Hite and Henry Vestine were very well steeped in the blues and it's history,and good musicians, it was the wierd little shy guy from Boston that pulled it all together. The sound of that just right boogie was put together by Alan Wilson who calculated arrangements down to the nth degree in studio and did the general arrangment of songs done live.  I'm sorry my musical hero was so depressed most of the time.
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« Reply #1444 on: February 27, 2013, 06:17:10 PM »

Been reading Jack London short stories online (free)

John Barleycorn was very interesting and probably the first modern book of any kind about subjective alcoholism. It was also his biography, of sorts.

Also reading about the Battle of Britain, air war in WW II.
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« Reply #1445 on: March 11, 2013, 05:32:43 PM »

I've decided to go through the whole "Jack Reacher" series from Lee Childs.  Just finished the first one;   "Killing Floor". 

Before I move on the the second one I'm taking a break by reading   "Blind But Now I See":  the biography of Arthel "Doc" Watson.
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« Reply #1446 on: March 11, 2013, 09:01:35 PM »

"Guitar Zero" by Gary Marcus (was on NY Times best seller list).  Marcus is a well-known  cognitive psychologist who decided to learn guitar when he was about age 40.  Lots of good discussion here about learning music and how the brain deals with it.  A good read for really old beginning guitarists like me.
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« Reply #1447 on: March 12, 2013, 04:07:41 AM »

I've decided to go through the whole "Jack Reacher" series from Lee Childs.  Just finished the first one;   "Killing Floor". 

Before I move on the the second one I'm taking a break by reading   "Blind But Now I See":  the biography of Arthel "Doc" Watson.
That Doc bio is pretty poorly written (could've used an editor) and the smear job he does on Doc's son Merle is a real shame. Could've been such a good book.
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« Reply #1448 on: March 12, 2013, 11:33:12 AM »

I just finished Stephen King's "From a Buick 8".  I'm reading another Ann Rule book, "The Stranger Beside Me".  It's about her and Ted Bundy working together years before, never suspecting he'd turn out to be one of the worst serial killers in America.
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« Reply #1449 on: March 30, 2013, 02:51:58 PM »

Just got done with Robert Lewis's "Raising a Modern-Day Knight."  Excellent book on manhood and fatherhood.  It came out in the 90s and I'd heard a lot about it over the years.  Glad I read it.  Will be rereading it soon.

I just started one I've had my eye on for a while: Letters, Journals and Diaries of ye Old Colonial America by Don Corbly.  The author gives a brief intro to the time period and then you just read it from the folks who were there.  Not stuffed full of dates no one remembers or other boring details like a history class, but it's the life these folks lived every day.  I can't find out much about this author, Don Corbly, or even how to contact him. I don't even remember how I stumbled across his work.  He seems pretty mysterious, and this is a self-published deal.  He's been a busy fellow and has written a lot though: http://doncorbly.com/
This book has really been a rare gem for me and I'll be enjoying it for a long time to come.  HIGHLY recommend. 
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« Reply #1450 on: March 30, 2013, 05:10:26 PM »

Interesting recommendation, creature.  I am on the last pages of A Mad Desire to Dance by Elie Weisel.  Good, but not one of his better if you ask me.
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« Reply #1451 on: March 31, 2013, 05:06:04 AM »

Interesting recommendation, creature.  I am on the last pages of A Mad Desire to Dance by Elie Weisel.  Good, but not one of his better if you ask me.
All I've read of him is "Night."  Pretty heavy to say the least.
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ryler
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« Reply #1452 on: April 07, 2013, 10:15:40 PM »

Yes, creature, I remember being quite moved by Night.  Does anyone have any good fiction recommendations?  I'm not liking what I've chosen for my next read and would love some ideas.
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Caleb
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« Reply #1453 on: April 08, 2013, 09:20:12 PM »

Yes, creature, I remember being quite moved by Night.  Does anyone have any good fiction recommendations?  I'm not liking what I've chosen for my next read and would love some ideas.
Have you read Peace Like a River by Lief Enger?  Great book. I've been thinking of carving out time for a reread of it.  Same for Wendell Berry's Hannah Coulter.  Both excellent works.  
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« Reply #1454 on: April 08, 2013, 09:55:03 PM »

I did read Peace Like a River and, like you, loved it.  I'll check out Hannah Coulter.  I love a good recommendation.  Thanks.
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« Reply #1455 on: April 09, 2013, 11:38:48 AM »

I'd recommend anything by the late great Tony Hillerman! His Navaho cop series with characters Jim Chee and Joe Leaphorn are outstanding reads. Very talented wordsmith. Also Garrison Keillor's Lake Wobegon books are filled with good reading and many smiles.
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« Reply #1456 on: April 16, 2013, 04:59:33 PM »

Just started a reread of To Kill a Mockingbird.  Such a great book on so many levels. The writing is excellent, the flow is nice and easy, the characters well-formed, etc.  There's a reason this one is a classic.  Do read it at least once in your life if you've not done so already. 
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« Reply #1457 on: April 16, 2013, 07:58:40 PM »

Black Rednecks and White Liberals by Thomas Sowell.
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« Reply #1458 on: April 17, 2013, 01:02:31 PM »

Re-Reading "The Ragamuffin Gospel" by Brennan Manning.
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« Reply #1459 on: April 17, 2013, 04:22:06 PM »

Rereading Stephen Kings "Cujo".  My son has it on his Nook so I thought I'd read it again.  Much better then the movie.
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