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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 311672 times)
GeeNorm
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« Reply #1240 on: May 23, 2012, 05:03:47 PM »

Amazon's Kindle Store is going to drain my bank account! I follow several authors including Preston and Child, David Baldacci <sp?>, Lee Child, and others.

Now I am revisiting some of the free Kindle classics. I am currently rereading Verne's The Mysterious Island. I had forgotten just how detailed Verne could be, particularly after being subjected to abridged and "updated" films based on this novel.

Norman
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« Reply #1241 on: May 23, 2012, 05:24:16 PM »

"War of the Worldviews: Science Vs. Spirituality " Deepak Chopra and Leonard Mlodinow. Not about the false dichotomy between faith and science but rather a discussion of the ways people search for meaning. Chopra is of course famous for his PBS shows on spirituality, but is actually a well respected endocrinologist. Mlodinow is a professor (PhD. U Cal) of theoretical physics at Cal Tech who also wrote scripts for Star Trek: the Next Generation.
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« Reply #1242 on: May 26, 2012, 07:42:54 PM »

I just purchased Stephen King's new "The Wind through the Keyhole" release from Amazon.ca. It's part of the Dark Tower series and fits somewhere in the middle of the series. Looking forward to this one.
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ryler
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« Reply #1243 on: May 27, 2012, 11:31:43 AM »

The Sense of An Ending, Julian Barnes.  Very short, very well written.  I'm enjoying it.  Kind of reminds me of A Separate Peace by John Knowles. 
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Danny
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« Reply #1244 on: May 28, 2012, 08:47:53 PM »

I just now closed the book "Strong men Armed" THE U.S. MARINES AGAINST JAPAN, by Robert Leckie. It's interesting that on Memorial day I finished this long detailed book. My head is full of thoughts regarding all the battles fought by the Marines from Guadalcanal to Okinawa, and the final Landing on the beach of Japan itself to receive the solders surrender.

   Robert Leckie is a Marine who fought in most of the conflicts he wrote about, so the impressions he gives are heart felt.  A long read, but well worth my time.


And one little added note, Thank you Mr. Leckie and all your fellow Marines for your tremendous sacrifice. We'll never forget.
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« Reply #1245 on: May 29, 2012, 06:16:02 PM »

"Killing Lincoln" is a very close-up and detailed view of the lives swirling around the assassination. 

Very well written (I think) and quite sobering.

That's what I'm reading now, using old-school paper as the medium.   
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« Reply #1246 on: May 29, 2012, 10:26:23 PM »

    I am starting a book written by an author recommended by an active duty marine. "The March Up" Bing West and Maj. General Ray Smith USMC (ret.) co-wrote this one on the taking of Baghdad with the 1st Marine Division.
    I am not interested that much in more recent history, but this young marine that recommended "Bing West" seemed impressed with his writing and he is on his 3rd tour of duty over in the sand dunes. So I must see whats here in this book and another one "No True Glory" by Bing West.

  Oh yea, both of my books are paper/hardbacks. +1
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« Reply #1247 on: May 29, 2012, 10:27:52 PM »

Homer & Langley by E.L. Doctorow.  It's his newest.  Very early in the book, but so far, so good. 
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Caleb
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« Reply #1248 on: May 30, 2012, 01:55:38 AM »

The Wizard by H. Rider Haggard
Not sure anything can compare to King Solomon's Mines but I'm enjoying this one a lot.

I'm also about halfway through a very slow read of Louis L'Amour's Jubal Sackett.  Really a great story.
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« Reply #1249 on: May 30, 2012, 02:01:12 AM »

Picking through the freebies I've loaded into my iPhone, I ran across "The Absence of Mr. Glass" by G.K. Chesterton.  Also still reading "The Man Who Was Thursday" by the same author.  Also just started "Searching for God Knows What" by Donald Miller.  I'm liking it better than "Blue Like Jazz".
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Caleb
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« Reply #1250 on: May 30, 2012, 02:32:00 AM »

Picking through the freebies I've loaded into my iPhone, I ran across "The Absence of Mr. Glass" by G.K. Chesterton.  Also still reading "The Man Who Was Thursday" by the same author.  Also just started "Searching for God Knows What" by Donald Miller.  I'm liking it better than "Blue Like Jazz".

Searching by Miller is great, though I likes Through Painted Deserts better. Didn't care for Jazz at all.
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« Reply #1251 on: June 03, 2012, 12:54:21 AM »

Finished "The Man Who Was Thursday" by G.K. Chesterton.  Disappointed with the rather nonsense ending.  First book by him I haven't enjoyed through to the end.  Also finished "The Absence of Mr. Glass" by same author.  This is hardly a book, but more of a short story as it was presented in serial fashion back in the day.  Much more clever ending.  A nice tidy read on a 3 hour flight.  Also finished "Kings Cross" by Timothy Keller.  A new favorite author.

Started "Orthodoxy" by G.K. Chesterton.  I can tell I'm going to re-read this one many times.  Great book on apologetics.
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« Reply #1252 on: June 03, 2012, 03:23:14 AM »

Finished "The Man Who Was Thursday" by G.K. Chesterton.  Disappointed with the rather nonsense ending.  First book by him I haven't enjoyed through to the end.  Also finished "The Absence of Mr. Glass" by same author.  This is hardly a book, but more of a short story as it was presented in serial fashion back in the day.  Much more clever ending.  A nice tidy read on a 3 hour flight.  Also finished "Kings Cross" by Timothy Keller.  A new favorite author.

Started "Orthodoxy" by G.K. Chesterton.  I can tell I'm going to re-read this one many times.  Great book on apologetics.
Read Orthodoxy twice in a row a few years back. Blew my mind.
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Caleb
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« Reply #1253 on: June 12, 2012, 06:12:41 PM »

Reading The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper. Been on the list a long time.  Lots of flowery language and long sentences. I like books like this from time to time.  But I've learned to spread out "classic" works. Helps to focus on them and give them the attention they deserve.
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« Reply #1254 on: June 12, 2012, 06:24:05 PM »

Reading The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper. Been on the list a long time.  Lots of flowery language and long sentences. I like books like this from time to time.  But I've learned to spread out "classic" works. Helps to focus on them and give them the attention they deserve.

Tried Cooper's "The Spy", and just couldn't keep the characters straight. I gave up after 80 pages or so.  Too many characters seemed like the same person; couldn't tell who was aligned with which side (apropos I suppose), couldn't tell who was in the family and who wasn't - all scenes in one house, etc.  Very confusing in fact.

I need to know who the good guy(s) and who the bad guy(s) is/are pretty quick, or at least fool me first, so that the twists feel like twists, instead of feeling that I'm lost in the mist.

-Scott
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« Reply #1255 on: June 12, 2012, 06:45:28 PM »

Tried Cooper's "The Spy", and just couldn't keep the characters straight. I gave up after 80 pages or so.  Too many characters seemed like the same person; couldn't tell who was aligned with which side (apropos I suppose), couldn't tell who was in the family and who wasn't - all scenes in one house, etc.  Very confusing in fact.

I need to know who the good guy(s) and who the bad guy(s) is/are pretty quick, or at least fool me first, so that the twists feel like twists, instead of feeling that I'm lost in the mist.

-Scott
I can see that. It's somewhat tough to keep things straight in Mohicans for the first few chapters.  Dickens can be like that for me too.  Another reason why I spread out classics.
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« Reply #1256 on: June 12, 2012, 06:48:12 PM »

  Also finished "Kings Cross" by Timothy Keller.  A new favorite author.


I am a huge fan of Keller's work! "Generous Justice" is compelling as well. Just finished Steve Brown's "Three Free Sins" - Steve, Keller, and John Piper are my big three (among living Chrisitan authors).

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« Reply #1257 on: June 12, 2012, 07:18:03 PM »

Clive Cussler 'Jungle
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Chris
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« Reply #1258 on: June 14, 2012, 12:55:09 PM »

  Finished "The March UP" and starting a book by the same author. "No True Glory" by Bing West.
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« Reply #1259 on: June 14, 2012, 05:58:04 PM »

I'm reading and very much enjoying The Sisters Brothers by Patrick DeWitt. A twisted western that my best bud recommended highly and lent to me. You might like it. 
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