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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 310543 times)
ducktrapper
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« Reply #940 on: February 24, 2011, 04:28:42 AM »

Just finished Tom Wolfe's From Bauhaus to Our House. A breezy read at 110 pages. Ostensibly about architecture. A must read, I don't why it took me so long to get around to it. Highly recommended.

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cke
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« Reply #941 on: February 24, 2011, 04:39:24 AM »

Just finished Tom Wolfe's From Bauhaus to Our House. A breezy read at 110 pages. Ostensibly about architecture. A must read, I don't why it took me so long to get around to it. Highly recommended.


Loved that book too. And all of his books. Great writer.
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Chris
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ryler
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« Reply #942 on: February 24, 2011, 02:28:13 PM »

Duck,

When you say "ostensibly" about architecture, what's the deeper theme of the book?
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #943 on: February 24, 2011, 05:46:57 PM »

Duck,

When you say "ostensibly" about architecture, what's the deeper theme of the book?

Well, it's about what became of architecture in the 20th century and how a certain school of thought came to dominate the activity even though human beings themselves, hated it. An analogy can be drawn, at least by me and I think by Wolfe, that similar totalitarian or perhaps, if you prefer, postmodern thought has bunged up other areas of life and not just modern architecture. Marxism, by any other name, in any other area of human activity, is theoretically appealing to some but, in practice, it's all bunk. That's my take, anyway.   
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Caleb
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« Reply #944 on: February 24, 2011, 05:55:58 PM »

I remember once reading an essay by Chesterton (the fat guy on the previous page for those who missed it) about how architecture changed drastically as our view of the eternal started to fade.  In a nutshell, when folks believed in eternity and eternal values, their buildings (and art in general) reflected that.  But today things are not meant to last, because at our core we don't really believe anything will.  
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cke
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« Reply #945 on: February 24, 2011, 06:25:26 PM »

Well, it's about what became of architecture in the 20th century and how a certain school of thought came to dominate the activity even though human beings themselves, hated it. An analogy can be drawn, at least by me and I think by Wolfe, that similar totalitarian or perhaps, if you prefer, postmodern thought has bunged up other areas of life and not just modern architecture. Marxism, by any other name, in any other area of human activity, is theoretically appealing to some but, in practice, it's all bunk. That's my take, anyway.   
Pretty good summary. 
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Chris
Larrivee's '07  L-09 (40th Commemorative); '09 00-03 S.E; '08 P-09
Eastman '07 AC 650-12 Jumbo (NAMM)
Martin   '11 D Mahogany (FSC Golden Era type)
Voyage-Air '10 VAOM-06
-the nylon string-
Goya (Levin) '58 G-30
-dulcimer-
'11 McSpadden
broKen
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« Reply #946 on: February 24, 2011, 09:59:32 PM »

I remember once reading an essay by Chesterton (the fat guy on the previous page for those who missed it) about how architecture changed drastically as our view of the eternal started to fade.  In a nutshell, when folks believed in eternity and eternal values, their buildings (and art in general) reflected that.  But today things are not meant to last, because at our core we don't really believe anything will.  

That's interesting, but I can't say I know anything about the arts or architecture. It would make for interesting study. What you (or Chesterton) said here reminds me of something I read recently though. The idea was that if the foundations are destroyed, the basis of civilization will be gone, i.e. civility will end. To put it another way, every man does what is right in his own eyes.

Monarchy is the only form of government that will endure. Just my opinion.
Sorry for the sidetrack here. I shan't do it again. Now back to books.
Here is one I'm sure no one here will recognize. I've been working through "Not Without Design" by M. Rosenthal.
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Caleb
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« Reply #947 on: February 25, 2011, 12:53:28 AM »

broKen: I enjoyed the sidetrack. 

Currently reading:

'Think' by John Piper.  Excellent so far.  It's mainly about...thinking.  I'm particularly enjoying his take on anti-intellectualism in evangelical Christianity. 

I'm also doing my annual reading of the Chronicles of Narnia.  I'm going through The Horse and His Boy right now.  I like these better each time I read them.  And I've read them a bunch. 
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Danny
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« Reply #948 on: March 09, 2011, 05:39:40 AM »

  My wife handed me a few novels a couple of days ago. "To Dance with the White Dog" by Terry Kay was hard to put down. I just finished it and I will never forget Sam, Neelie, White Dog and the emotional engagement of this novel.
  There was a surprise disclaimer after the end of the book. It really adds something to the feelings created in you by this story. But do not read it beforehand, it would ruin the story in my view. I said this in case you stumble upon it before finishing the book, just leave it for after the end. It was an unexpected delight and surprise.

                  (Much better than Hemingway, IMHO)     LIFE, LOSS, MYSTERY, AND HOPE
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
ryler
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« Reply #949 on: March 09, 2011, 02:06:25 PM »

Danny,

That's an intriguing endorsement.  I may have to pick that one up. 
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Caleb
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« Reply #950 on: March 09, 2011, 03:16:45 PM »

Danny/ryler: I checked the reviews on Amazon and it's highly spoken of.  I've never heard of this one.  But it sounds interesting.  I like hopeful stories and have pretty much resolved to read only those kinds of books for the rest of my life.  My reading time is precious to me, so why waste it reading something that makes me sad?  

I just started Annals of a Quiet Neighborhood by George MacDonald

and

Farmer Boy by Laura Ingalls Wilder.  If you like pioneer-era history, you would like her books.  I have learned more about the daily lives of those folks and how they did things than I have in any other reading on the subject.  If you can manage to shaked the "children's book" stigma from your mind, and realize a good book is just a good book, then you'd look hard to find better writing on pioneer life.  
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Danny
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« Reply #951 on: March 09, 2011, 03:38:31 PM »

  I asked my wife if she had seen the disclaimer at the end and she had not. In a good book I always am sad to end it so I tend to turn the page just in case. Once in awhile there is something tacked on that ties things up quite neatly.
  There was a TV movie made about this book, but I think it does not come close to the depth the written word delivers (as most movies don't).
                   Anyway it's an easy read as well, so check it out.
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
jeremy3220
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« Reply #952 on: March 09, 2011, 04:06:15 PM »

I'm about to embark on 'Atlas Shrugged'. I didn't realize it was over a thousand pages and made the mistake of ordering the cheap mass market version with the small pages and print.
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Danny
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« Reply #953 on: March 09, 2011, 04:15:49 PM »

I'm about to embark on 'Atlas Shrugged'. I didn't realize it was over a thousand pages and made the mistake of ordering the cheap mass market version with the small pages and print.
  I use some reading lamps that are high intensity. I also use these when I work on guitar finishes. It helps my reading very much.
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
cke
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« Reply #954 on: March 09, 2011, 06:15:02 PM »

Just picked up David Brooks new book "The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement"
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Chris
Larrivee's '07  L-09 (40th Commemorative); '09 00-03 S.E; '08 P-09
Eastman '07 AC 650-12 Jumbo (NAMM)
Martin   '11 D Mahogany (FSC Golden Era type)
Voyage-Air '10 VAOM-06
-the nylon string-
Goya (Levin) '58 G-30
-dulcimer-
'11 McSpadden
jeremy3220
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« Reply #955 on: March 10, 2011, 03:55:07 AM »

  I use some reading lamps that are high intensity. I also use these when I work on guitar finishes. It helps my reading very much.

Thanks, I'll make sure there's plenty of light.
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Danny
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« Reply #956 on: April 11, 2011, 01:56:28 AM »

  Finished "Beyond Band of Brothers" by Major Dick Winters. After reading Citizen Soldier and Band of Brothers by Stephen Ambrose, this book from the memoirs of Major Winters is very welcome. It fills in some of the holes and corrects just a few matters.
  Of all the members of Easy Company and I think even the 101st Airborne, who started at Tacoa, Major Winters was the last to die recently. Thanks to Tom Hanks and others they will never be forgotten as the "Band of Brothers".

           I was listening to a WW II vet today speaking of being shot down and captured in Holland. I was just in the right place at the right time. When I heard him speaking to someone else I just knew immediately I needed to sit down nearby and listen. I thought of walking over and thanking him, but was afraid I might embarrass him if I welled up with tears or something, so I just listened.

           I am very thankful and proud of all the men and women who have fought for freedom around the world. Especially proud of those who resisted the evil of the Nazi's and others in WW II.
                                                        I for one will never forget what they did for us all.
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Caleb
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« Reply #957 on: April 12, 2011, 12:00:07 PM »

I'm on a Louis L'Amour short story kick of late.  Rowdy Rides to Glory is one of the best stories I've read in a long time.  A good short story is like a breath of fresh air. 
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Danny
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« Reply #958 on: April 14, 2011, 12:04:36 AM »

  Just started "About Face" another thick book that I intend to read every word, cover to cover. Already it has me intrigued.
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ryler
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« Reply #959 on: April 14, 2011, 01:51:04 PM »

  Just started "About Face" another thick book that I intend to read every word, cover to cover. Already it has me intrigued.

I read a lot of that book a few years ago.  The one by Col. David Hackworth.  My husband saw him speak and brought home the book for me.  It was a fascinating read.  Funny, after the last one you read I was going to post a recommendation of Hackworth's to you, Danny, but didn't.  It is long, that's for sure, but very worthwhile. 

Creature, I've been picking up Louis L'Amour books (on your recommnedation) for my husband to listen to in the car and he's hooked.

I am reading Freedom by Jonathan Franzen.  So far, tepid.  I'm wondering if I'll sense an overall point to it beyond quotidian description and banter.  I love a good description of the everyday goings on, but it has to be part of a larger context--that's what I can't yet discern.
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