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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 308904 times)
ducktrapper
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« Reply #820 on: June 16, 2010, 04:44:22 PM »

You might enjoy "Bury my Heart at Wounded Knee"

Wounded knee is an actual history. Howard Zinn is to history as Oliver Stone is to film making. I.E. a propagandist. He picks and chooses his "facts" as much, if not more, as any he would criticize. Matt Damon isn't a super genius, although he played one in a movie, but is a huge fan. A fan of an historian? What more can I say? There are far better and more honest historians. Historians without agendas. Victor Davis Hanson comes to mind. Have you, at least, read William L. Shirer?  
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Walkerman
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« Reply #821 on: June 16, 2010, 06:03:24 PM »

Wounded knee is an actual history. Howard Zinn is to history as Oliver Stone is to film making. I.E. a propagandist. He picks and chooses his "facts" as much, if not more, as any he would criticize. Matt Damon isn't a super genius, although he played one in a movie, but is a huge fan. A fan of an historian? What more can I say? There are far better and more honest historians. Historians without agendas. Victor Davis Hanson comes to mind. Have you, at least, read William L. Shirer?  

I dunno...have you, at least, read W.S. Churchill. O.von Bismark, A. Lincoln, U.S. Grant and others?  I mean, Shirer was a journalist...much as Dan Rather.  Might as well get your history "from the horses mouth."

Bury My Heart wasn't "just" about the massacre, it was about the entire native american history...and yes, it was told with a bias towards the native americans.  So?
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Caleb
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« Reply #822 on: June 16, 2010, 06:24:34 PM »

As far as I know Zinn is a self-proclaimed communist and makes no apologies for it.  At any rate, I don't expect anyone that popular and with that many Hollywood celebrities associating themselves with him to be anything other than pretty radical and extremely left-leaning.  Based on the fact that Matt Damon and Danny Glover are working with him was/is enough to keep me away from his "work."
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Danny
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« Reply #823 on: June 21, 2010, 01:50:03 AM »

                                    "UNDAUNTED COURAGE" Stephen E. Ambrose

             Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the opening of the American West
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« Reply #824 on: June 21, 2010, 12:13:02 PM »

                                   "UNDAUNTED COURAGE" Stephen E. Ambrose

             Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the opening of the American West
I tried to read that one but just couldn't warm up to it.  Maybe it was the mood I was in or the season of life.  That happens sometimes.  I was interested in Lewis and Clark, but kept getting bogged down with all the detail of that book.  Can you recommend a more concise volume on the subject?
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Danny
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« Reply #825 on: June 21, 2010, 03:06:16 PM »

I tried to read that one but just couldn't warm up to it.  Maybe it was the mood I was in or the season of life.  That happens sometimes.  I was interested in Lewis and Clark, but kept getting bogged down with all the detail of that book.  Can you recommend a more concise volume on the subject?
  Have you seen the special that PBS put out? That was one of the best I ever saw. I can't remember if that was Ken Burns for sure. But I think it was. I highly recommend the DVD and if they have companion book that would be a good one.

     I like the details myself. It seems to draw me more into that period in history and give me a fuller realization of the significance of events.
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« Reply #826 on: June 21, 2010, 04:14:50 PM »

  Have you seen the special that PBS put out? That was one of the best I ever saw. I can't remember if that was Ken Burns for sure. But I think it was. I highly recommend the DVD and if they have companion book that would be a good one.

     I like the details myself. It seems to draw me more into that period in history and give me a fuller realization of the significance of events.
I'll check the library for you recommendation.  I think I was looking more for the journals of Lewis and Clark rather than the type of thing Ambrose was going for. 
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Caleb
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« Reply #827 on: June 22, 2010, 01:59:25 PM »

Hero Tales from American History by Henry Cabot Lodge and Theodore Roosevelt

I'm only three chapters in where they're describing the Battle of Trenton, and I can already highly recommend for the lover of US history!
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« Reply #828 on: June 23, 2010, 07:06:33 PM »

     Just got down reading "The Prey" by Michael Crichton a while back.  It was quite suspenseful and a pretty good read.  I'm 3/4's way through "Boneman's Daughters" by Ted Dekker.  It' about a serial killer who try's to claim young girls as his own, but without much luck as you may understand.

Old folky
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« Reply #829 on: June 23, 2010, 07:13:36 PM »

How Soccer Explains the World.  Seems a fitting read given the world cup and the various threads current here relating to soccer, the economy, morality, etc.
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« Reply #830 on: June 23, 2010, 10:15:05 PM »

My Name is Asher Lev by Chaim Potok, as recommended by a forumite a few pages ago.  Can't remember who to give the credit to, but so far (maybe a third of the way in) it is very good.  Thanks for suggesting it.
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« Reply #831 on: June 24, 2010, 01:50:12 AM »

I love Potok. I haven't read him in a long time. I remember really liking My Name is Asher Lev. I'm still reading The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay. I'm listening to Summerland (both by Michael Chabon), and Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card.

Deb
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« Reply #832 on: June 27, 2010, 10:44:35 AM »

"Always Looking Up" by Michael J. Fox.

He talks about Work, Politics, Faith and Family and it's a remarkable story about a guy who left home from Vancouver, B.C. and went to L.A. @ 18 alone to make it on his own. I knew about his battle with Parkinson's Disease but now I have a much better understanding about his efforts to help find a cure. There's a lot more to him than Family Ties, Back to the Future, The Secret of my Success and Spin City.
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« Reply #833 on: June 28, 2010, 02:22:53 AM »

FYI, Howard Zinn passed away earlier this year at 87. He was an immensely well regarded and popular professor at Boston University for decades. Much of his cynicism began in the second world war, during which he flew many bombing missions in Europe.
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Caleb
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« Reply #834 on: July 01, 2010, 08:31:47 PM »

Settlers of the Western Woods by Steve Hartz

Hartz is a Renaissance Man from Texas.  He writes, paints, plays music, fixes instruments, and seems to be an all-around interesting fellow.  This book is East Texas folklore, but I think it would appeal to anyone interested in 19th century pioneer history.  Another plus, the book comes with a CD of mostly original music, all done in the old-time style.  Excellent stuff that I cannot stop listening to.  

Hartz also runs on old-time themed shop in Nocogdoches, Texas, that sells instruments, old stuff, old-timey type stuff, and does instrument repairs.  From what I understand there is a great old-time session there each Saturday as well.  

Google this guy and check him out.  
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Danny
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« Reply #835 on: July 01, 2010, 09:08:42 PM »

Settlers of the Western Woods by Steve Hartz

Hartz is a Renaissance Man from Texas.  He writes, paints, plays music, fixes instruments, and seems to be an all-around interesting fellow.  This book is East Texas folklore, but I think it would appeal to anyone interested in 19th century pioneer history.  Another plus, the book comes with a CD of mostly original music, all done in the old-time style.  Excellent stuff that I cannot stop listening to. 

Hartz also runs on old-time themed shop in Nocogdoches, Texas, that sells instruments, old stuff, old-timey type stuff, and does instrument repairs.  From what I understand there is a great old-time session there each Saturday as well. 

Google this guy and check him out. 
  I like this song off the c.d.
http://www20.inetba.com/oldtimestringshop/filecabinet/SettlersSoundFiles/TheCaneRiverWaltz.mp3
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Caleb
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« Reply #836 on: July 02, 2010, 11:57:55 AM »

Yes, that's a good one.  It's one of those CDs where I truly like every song though.  And I don't get CDs like that very often.  It's a bit pricey, due to it being a book/CD package, but well worth it.  It's a high-quality, hardback book printed on thick glossy paper.  Excellent reading...and listening!
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #837 on: July 02, 2010, 01:34:18 PM »

I dunno...have you, at least, read W.S. Churchill. O.von Bismark, A. Lincoln, U.S. Grant and others?  I mean, Shirer was a journalist...much as Dan Rather.  Might as well get your history "from the horses mouth."

Bury My Heart wasn't "just" about the massacre, it was about the entire native american history...and yes, it was told with a bias towards the native americans.  So?

You mention the greats. As far as pop history goes, Shirer did a magnificent job unlike Zinn. Bias is something that always exists. It doesn't mean there will be no truth involved. Zinn's bias is used to alter history to make political points that enthuse and amuse the Marxist, anti-American, anti-western left.   
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Caleb
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« Reply #838 on: July 02, 2010, 02:05:52 PM »

I like old history books. To me they were written with more class and style.  The bitterness and obvious bias (left or right) of many of today's historians can be spotted right away.  But the bottom line for me is that the writers of yesteryear were just nicer people who seemed to hold the craft of writing in a much more honorable light than you see today.  Books were once holy ground where ideas were sacred; today they are tools for the rant of the day.  I find most modern history books just jabs at the other side, whichever side that may be.  The writers of yesteryear were simply a classier lot, in my opinion. 

Personal note: I'm about as interested in Zinn's viewpoint as I am Glenn Beck's.  No thanks.   
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Caleb
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« Reply #839 on: July 19, 2010, 02:02:31 PM »

The Fellowship of the Ring - JRR Tolkien
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