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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 327212 times)
Dotneck
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« Reply #800 on: May 18, 2010, 02:38:26 PM »

I've been digging into Howard Zinn's "The People's History of the United States".

Histories are usually written by the victors....this book is written from the point of view of the folks effected by historical events. People like Native Americans and slaves. I'm only a quarter of the way through it but its a pretty interesting look at the US.
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« Reply #801 on: May 18, 2010, 03:50:01 PM »

Am currently re-reading a novel called Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, originally published in German by an author named Patrick Suskind.  Fantastic immersion into a world of scent -- the dominant imagery throughout the novel is olfactory rather than visual (though the visual imagery is quite well done as well).  I'd highly recommend it if you're in the mood for a strange, wonderful, surprising, and thoughtful summer read.
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« Reply #802 on: May 18, 2010, 10:29:43 PM »

I've been digging into Howard Zinn's "The People's History of the United States".

Histories are usually written by the victors....this book is written from the point of view of the folks effected by historical events. People like Native Americans and slaves. I'm only a quarter of the way through it but its a pretty interesting look at the US.

 
I happen to be reading A History of the American People, by Paul Johnson.  I can tell that it's slanted, but it happens to be generally in my direction, so that's OK.  

I've learned some interesting things along the way, especially about our Presidents.   Some were apparently better than I thought; others were worse.

I'm reminded that crises in banking have happened before.  Amazingly in light of recent events it was a banker who saved the day in one panic.

Perhaps when I finish this book (I'm reading about the Kennedys now), I'll look for Zinn's book and get a different slant on things.
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« Reply #803 on: May 19, 2010, 04:26:30 AM »

I've actually got the Zinn book in my stack. It's been there too long and I should get to it.

I'm reading Philip Norman's John Lennon: The Life which is pretty impressive. I've learned a lot of new stuff about the Beatles. Lennon was a scoundrel in the early days. In fact, they all were. The 1970s' punk movement had nothing on those guys!

A good, easy book I finished a few months back is Big Man: Real Life & Tall Tales by Clarence Clemons & Don Reo. That book was just a blast. I never knew much about Clarence, but the cover looked interesting and so I picked it up on a whim for for a train ride from Chicago to Flagstaff. I was laughing out loud the whole way home. Highly recommended!
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Caleb
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« Reply #804 on: May 27, 2010, 07:56:42 PM »

I'm (finally) reading Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis.  I've wanted to read it for years, and I'm having a ball with it.  I'm on chapter 17 (about half way through) and this is the kind of book I'm already wishing had no end.  Absolutely facsinating writing style, and the peeks inside Babbitt's head are often times hilarious, sometimes sad, but always a little revealing about the life we all lead on the inside.  I'm not sure if I've ever read a book like this, and I can tell I'll be reading more from this author.  

Props to Jeremy for saying something (somewhere) in this thread about Babbitt long ago.  He posted a quote from the book and I put it on my list then and there.  

The most beautiful thing about this book is that I have no idea where it's going, but at the same time I don't really want to know.  It's like a stroll on a beautiful day going nowhere in particular.  And that doesn't come along very often in books for me.  Do read this one if you've not.  Highly recommend!
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Slaminsam
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« Reply #805 on: May 27, 2010, 08:36:09 PM »

Current read lists:

The Skeptical Guitarist - Fingerstyle Guitar From Scratch - Great Read and great examples.

Music Principles for the Skeptical Guitarist Volume One: The Big Picture
 
The Bible
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #806 on: May 29, 2010, 01:57:59 AM »

I'm (finally) reading Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis.  I've wanted to read it for years, and I'm having a ball with it.  I'm on chapter 17 (about half way through) and this is the kind of book I'm already wishing had no end.  Absolutely facsinating writing style, and the peeks inside Babbitt's head are often times hilarious, sometimes sad, but always a little revealing about the life we all lead on the inside.  I'm not sure if I've ever read a book like this, and I can tell I'll be reading more from this author.  

Props to Jeremy for saying something (somewhere) in this thread about Babbitt long ago.  He posted a quote from the book and I put it on my list then and there.  

The most beautiful thing about this book is that I have no idea where it's going, but at the same time I don't really want to know.  It's like a stroll on a beautiful day going nowhere in particular.  And that doesn't come along very often in books for me.  Do read this one if you've not.  Highly recommend!

That's great. It's certainly one of my favorites. Those peeks inside Babbitt's head were so revealing I felt almost like I was privy to seeing something I shouldn't. It was also an interesting peek into the culture of that time and how it made people a product of it in a way - how it made them spend time thinking about a new Zeeco car, how the latest religious fad shaped their values, how it let them down.
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Caleb
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« Reply #807 on: May 29, 2010, 01:50:00 PM »

That's great. It's certainly one of my favorites. Those peeks inside Babbitt's head were so revealing I felt almost like I was privy to seeing something I shouldn't. It was also an interesting peek into the culture of that time and how it made people a product of it in a way - how it made them spend time thinking about a new Zeeco car, how the latest religious fad shaped their values, how it let them down.
I've got about five chapter left and I'm still thoroughly enjoying it.  Have you read Main Street by Sinclair Lewis?  I'm looking at that one for my list...
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #808 on: May 29, 2010, 02:33:35 PM »

I've got about five chapter left and I'm still thoroughly enjoying it.  Have you read Main Street by Sinclair Lewis?  I'm looking at that one for my list...

Nope, I don't know why but I haven't read anything else by him. Guess I ought to.
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Caleb
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« Reply #809 on: May 29, 2010, 02:48:35 PM »

Nope, I don't know why but I haven't read anything else by him. Guess I ought to.
I can't remember where... maybe in Travels with Charley (probably)... Steinbeck talks about this book and I've been interested in it ever since.  I checked it out from the library once but never dug into it. 
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Danny
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« Reply #810 on: May 30, 2010, 07:24:06 PM »

  I'm on the road for awhile so just two books.  The Bible and Simply Guitar.
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« Reply #811 on: May 31, 2010, 11:38:57 AM »

Finished Babbitt yesterday.  I'm not sure what else to say about it other than I highly recommend it to anyone.  One of the best books I've ever read.

I've seen the Bible mentioned a couple times recently here.  I've been going through the Bible on audio book this year.  The Old Testament makes a lot more sense (to me) when it's going a little faster.  It helps all the laws and kings and names, etc. not just run together, but puts them into some kind of context.  I tend to be able to go through a lot more of it on audio than when I'm just reading. 

I currently have two version on audio: The English Standard Version read by Max McLean, and the old KJV read by Alexander Scourby.  I like them both, but probably prefer the Scourby version because I like the poetic voice and flow of the old language.  I highly recommend an audio Bible as a different approach to the Book.
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wyodeb
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« Reply #812 on: June 04, 2010, 04:37:02 AM »

Currently listening to Les Miserables (thank you, audible.com). I read it years ago. I'm enjoying having it read to me. This past year I've read lots of Neil Gaiman. I especially enjoyed The Graveyard Book, Anansi Boys and Neverwhere. I read The Help by Kathryn Stockett. It was pretty good. Right now we're listening to Summerland by Michael Chabon, and Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card. We finished the Tiffany Aching trilogy of Discworld books by Terry Pratchett. They were a delight and the narrator was excellent.

Deb
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Caleb
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« Reply #813 on: June 04, 2010, 11:55:45 AM »

Currently on my annual reading of Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe.  Probably my favorite book. 
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« Reply #814 on: June 04, 2010, 12:05:41 PM »

Julian Jaynes - The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind. Utterly, astonishingly and completely mind blowing idea. I was told it was one of the most important works of the 20th century and I'm thinking it may be so.
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« Reply #815 on: June 04, 2010, 12:12:20 PM »

The Spectator Bird by Wallace Stegner.
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« Reply #816 on: June 16, 2010, 03:15:04 AM »

The Bell Jar.....Sylvia Plath
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Caleb
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« Reply #817 on: June 16, 2010, 11:56:08 AM »

The Book of Psalms.
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Walkerman
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« Reply #818 on: June 16, 2010, 01:14:33 PM »

I've been digging into Howard Zinn's "The People's History of the United States".

Histories are usually written by the victors....this book is written from the point of view of the folks effected by historical events. People like Native Americans and slaves. I'm only a quarter of the way through it but its a pretty interesting look at the US.

You might enjoy "Bury my Heart at Wounded Knee"
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Walkerman
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« Reply #819 on: June 16, 2010, 01:16:38 PM »

"Liberty and Tyranny" by Mark Levin.
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