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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 310761 times)
ryler
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« Reply #740 on: January 30, 2010, 07:11:41 PM »

Just finished The Year of Magical Thinking, Joan Didion.  Compelling if the discussion of death and its effect on survivors doesn't darken your mood.  It was a memoir of her experience losing her husband, fellow writer John Gregory Dunne. 

Have moved on to That Old Cape Magic, Richard Russo.  I'm on page ten, so no opinions yet.  He's usually good for light reading.
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Caleb
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« Reply #741 on: February 05, 2010, 10:45:10 PM »

I Heard The Owl Call My Name by Margaret Craven. 
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GA-ME
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« Reply #742 on: February 06, 2010, 11:47:58 AM »

Race, Evolution, and Behavior by J. Phillippe Rushton
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Big Eric
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« Reply #743 on: February 06, 2010, 01:35:59 PM »

Linthead Stomp by Patrick Huber
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Strings4Him
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« Reply #744 on: February 06, 2010, 03:23:25 PM »

Race, Evolution, and Behavior by J. Phillippe Rushton

Interesting title.  I have even read that some "scholars" have done research in the area of evolutionary psychology.  When one considers what behaviors have survived during the "evolution" of man, one must shake his head about the theory of evolution.
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« Reply #745 on: February 06, 2010, 03:46:41 PM »

Interesting title.  I have even read that some "scholars" have done research in the area of evolutionary psychology.  When one considers what behaviors have survived during the "evolution" of man, one must shake his head about the theory of evolution.

Rushton is one of those "scholars" and the book is a product of that inquiry. I am not sure what you mean when you say "When one considers what behaviors have survived during the "evolution" of man, one must shake his head about the theory of evolution." though. However, this thread is probably not the place for a discussion of your meaning since it is a topic likely to degrade and end up with the thread getting axed.
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Strings4Him
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« Reply #746 on: February 06, 2010, 03:51:30 PM »

True.  Suffice it to say that the theory of evolution has fallen on hard times.  Regardless of one's postion, it is VERY healthy to have good discussion. 
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Walkerman
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« Reply #747 on: February 06, 2010, 06:04:37 PM »

  "Roughing it" is also a Twain autobiography that I enjoyed immensely.

Danny....try "Innocents Abroad"
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Danny
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« Reply #748 on: February 06, 2010, 06:27:07 PM »

Danny....try "Innocents Abroad"
  I'm about halfway through "Travels with Charley", so I'll check this one out next. Thanks
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Caleb
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« Reply #749 on: February 06, 2010, 10:00:23 PM »

  I'm about halfway through "Travels with Charley", so I'll check this one out next. Thanks
I think we've talked about Travels with Charley in this thread, but it's one of my favorite books.  I need to reread that one this year.  Oh, the ever-growing rereading list. . .
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Walkerman
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« Reply #750 on: February 08, 2010, 08:38:52 PM »

  I'm about halfway through "Travels with Charley", so I'll check this one out next. Thanks

looks like we have the same taste in books.  Love the part where he gets Charley to the giant redwoods......
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Walkerman
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« Reply #751 on: February 08, 2010, 08:40:18 PM »

True.  Suffice it to say that the theory of evolution has fallen on hard times.  Regardless of one's postion, it is VERY healthy to have good discussion. 

Not at all true re theory of evolution.
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Danny
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« Reply #752 on: February 08, 2010, 08:55:57 PM »

looks like we have the same taste in books.  Love the part where he gets Charley to the giant redwoods......
  I just read that part last night. Honestly I'm not looking forward to the racial tension section that I know is coming. But this has been very good so far.
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« Reply #753 on: February 08, 2010, 09:28:13 PM »

****Please take the evolution debate to some other thread.  ****


Regarding Travels... I really love Steinbeck's description of Montana in that book.  It made me want to put the book down and go straight to Montana to see it for myself.  Also, loved the Red Wood Forest description.  Truly a master with a pen!
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Danny
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« Reply #754 on: February 08, 2010, 10:52:08 PM »

  Same thing happened to me about Montana. My wife and I have been there and I mentioned his description and she and I both discussed going to Wyoming and Montana.
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« Reply #755 on: February 15, 2010, 01:17:45 PM »

  Well I finished "Travels with Charley" last night. The section about the racial tension in the deep south was indeed a hard read for me. I was sad to be finishing the "journey" but glad to be through that place in time.
  
     I had the thought in the closing pages that I understood this book far more than my education level should have qualified me for. But I have traveled to all 48 of the contiguous states and I'm not that young. In fact as I read the last chapter I began to think that Steinbeck must have been about my age on this trip. His thoughts seemed too close to my own when he reflected on politics,people and racial tension. So I looked at the jacket cover and found his age to be the same as mine when he took the trip and wrote the book. I have other thoughts as well regarding symbolism he used in the book. But I'll just say I believe this book is based on a real life journey across America, but is a fiction and at times some of the characters seem to be an aggregate composition of characters more than a specific individual.

    I also dug around our book shelves and looked at the many well preserved hardbacks we have and found some good reads. (but not "Innocents Abroad" though we have boxes of books somewhere stored and I may find it yet)

     Anyway I found what may be our oldest book. A one hundred thirty year old copy of "Outer-Mer". This is Longfellow's first work I believe. And this was a first edition hard bound Belford, Clarke & Co. book. A Caxton Edition with a lot of artwork done on the hardbound cover. (embossed?)
    I started reading some of it and it is "heavy" with intellectual thinking from Europe hundreds of years ago. I may only skim through this one for now and read the poems and a little of the text that sets them up. I'd rather go to Europe with Samuel Clemens in "Innocents Abroad"
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Caleb
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« Reply #756 on: February 15, 2010, 05:01:38 PM »

Excellent review.  Based on what I've read from your posts, your education level seems fine to me.  I've never stated my education level here, mainly because it colors others' views one way or the other.  Bottom line: it's not important.  Be a life-long learner in the spirit of Franklin, Lincoln, et al. 
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« Reply #757 on: February 16, 2010, 09:07:39 PM »

Fretboard Logic SE by Bill Edwards.
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« Reply #758 on: February 16, 2010, 09:10:15 PM »

"Man of Constant Sorrow" the biography of Ralph Stanley of the Stanley Brothers...
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« Reply #759 on: February 16, 2010, 10:01:13 PM »

"Man of Constant Sorrow" the biography of Ralph Stanley of the Stanley Brothers...

We just interviewed Ralph on the show a few weeks back...will let you know when the podcast goes up, he was an amazing interview!

Just finished reading "Crazy Heart"

Cheers,

S
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