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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 327265 times)
Greg Curtis
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« Reply #540 on: October 28, 2008, 07:50:48 PM »

I've pretty much educated myself thru reading books my entire life. Finished high school okay with good grades but no college just 2 yrs of tech school for an Associates Degree in electronics which has supported me thru life. I'm a sucker for military subjects on WWII and the Indian Wars during the 1800's. German tanks have always fascinated  me with their precision and firepower and I've modelled a pretty good collection of them. The episode with Custer and the Indian Wars is another one of particular interst to me. My bookcase is full of books on both subjects. Life is good!
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Caleb
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« Reply #541 on: November 01, 2008, 06:36:23 PM »

Just got done with Sidney Poitier's Measure of a Man.  It was an interesting story, and surely he's led an interesting life.  The New Age guru stuff toward the end was a complete turn-off to me, and I find his beliefs odd at best, but I did enjoy the book and am glad I read it. 

Up next is Ava's Man by Rick Bragg.  It's a biography and looked interesting, so I picked it up.  I've been wanting to get more into biography stuff of late, so we'll see how this one turns out.
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poki
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« Reply #542 on: November 04, 2008, 04:58:32 AM »

First Light: The True Story of the Boy Who Became a Man in the War-Torn Skies above Britain. By Geoffrey Wellum.
a first hand account of a wet behind the ears youngster who found himself piloting a Spitfire in the Battle of Britain.
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« Reply #543 on: November 09, 2008, 12:23:49 PM »

Just read History of the United States Volume I by Charles and Mary Beard.  This book is from the 1920s.  What I liked about it is that it didn't focus so much on famous personalities or battles, but rather the culture of the times back then and gave many facts about certain people groups.  I think I'm going to continue on with this set. 

Currently reading:  Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
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teh
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« Reply #544 on: November 09, 2008, 10:11:45 PM »

Just finishing "The Last Lecture" by Randy Pausch a former Computer Science Professor from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh who lost his battle with pancreatic cancer earlier this year.

This is a quick two day read and should be required reading for anyone searching for the meaning of life. There is a transcript of his final lecture and a video online and he was featured on 20/20 with Diane Sawyer. Check it out here:

http://www.thelastlecture.com/
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« Reply #545 on: November 09, 2008, 11:21:10 PM »

I haven't been doing much personal reading as of late, due to required readings for lectures, but I just recently finished reading The Devil's Music: A History Of The Blues by  Giles Oakley. Essentially the story of the Blues from Field hollers through the blues based rock type stuff, I'll give the old two thumbs up as it is interesting and a quick read. Also, I just finished The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals by Michael Pollan who was the also the author of The Botany of Desire both of which I'd reccomend to all. Learning a bit of off beat info about Johnny Apple Seed and ostensibly why there are so many spittter apple trees at farms was worth the price of admission for the Botany of Desire!
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jwb
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« Reply #546 on: November 10, 2008, 01:18:43 AM »

I'm back on my theology kick and digesting "God of Promise" by Michael Horton.  It's an introduction to Covenant Theology.  If any of you are interested in some DEEP Christian reading, I am the man to ask for recommendations.  I have not had the calling to read any fiction after crawling through Moby Dick following Queequeg's encouragement to read it.  It was a great experience to actually read the whole thing.  Then I listened to it on CD's...that was wonderful.  If anyone wants to listen to Moby Dick and has a long commute, let me know and I'll send the CD's to you.  I think there are 14 of them!!!

Justin
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Caleb
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« Reply #547 on: November 10, 2008, 01:24:43 AM »

I'm back on my theology kick and digesting "God of Promise" by Michael Horton.  It's an introduction to Covenant Theology.  If any of you are interested in some DEEP Christian reading, I am the man to ask for recommendations.  I have not had the calling to read any fiction after crawling through Moby Dick following Queequeg's encouragement to read it.  It was a great experience to actually read the whole thing.  Then I listened to it on CD's...that was wonderful.  If anyone wants to listen to Moby Dick and has a long commute, let me know and I'll send the CD's to you.  I think there are 14 of them!!!

Justin
I'm about to do Moby Dick on audio book form.  But I'm going to download it for free from librivox.org   East of Eden was 22 CDs.   That's a long one. 
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Caleb
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« Reply #548 on: November 15, 2008, 12:21:14 PM »

Been on a huge reading kick, but my guitar playing is really suffering for it...  If you could hear me play you'd understand.

Finished Jane Eyre.  Loved it. 

Just finished Common Sense by Thomas Paine.  Put out in early 1776, this book/pamplet may have been the final straw in the decision for Independence. Excellent read!

Reading Moby Dick by Herman Melville.  I'm about a quarter of the way through and some chapters are absolutely brilliant, but some others are techincal talk on whales, which is a real labor to get through. I'm sure most of you have already read this one, but this'll be my first go round with it.
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KenHolden
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« Reply #549 on: November 17, 2008, 12:37:31 AM »

I read a lot of Clive Cussler and Robert Ludlum novels while i was working this past spring and summer.  great stories.

Right now I have a collection of Canadian short stories and experts from Canadian novels. "when you were young" introduced by Stuart McLean.  Stuart McLean is the guy behind CBCs "the vinyl cafe".   he also has other books just on the vinyl cafe stories that are excellent reads.

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« Reply #550 on: November 19, 2008, 12:15:47 AM »

Been on a huge reading kick, but my guitar playing is really suffering for it...  If you could hear me play you'd understand.

Finished Jane Eyre.  Loved it. 

Just finished Common Sense by Thomas Paine.  Put out in early 1776, this book/pamplet may have been the final straw in the decision for Independence. Excellent read!

Reading Moby Dick by Herman Melville.  I'm about a quarter of the way through and some chapters are absolutely brilliant, but some others are techincal talk on whales, which is a real labor to get through. I'm sure most of you have already read this one, but this'll be my first go round with it.

Been on a huge guitar playing kick, but my reading is really suffering for it.  Just finished Bridge of Sighs by Richard Russo.  I brought this book up pages and pages ago, that's how long it took me to finish.  Good book.  Now I'm into Infinite Jest, by David Foster Wallace.  It's enormous (in page count) and I'm guessing enormous in scope.  I really, really like the beginning of it;  fascinating and structurally creative.  I haven't been this juiced about a book I've started in a long time.  But I think you might have to have a penchant for the weird to enjoy it.  Come, I don't know, maybe Easter I'll let you know if it stays this good.

Moby Dick is one of the books I gave up on.  I blame it on the teeny, tiny print of the edition I was reading.  Yeah, that was it...the print size.  I found my eyes glazing over too often.  Let us know, Creature, if you find it worth the effort it requires.
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Caleb
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« Reply #551 on: November 19, 2008, 12:28:10 PM »

I'm in the final stretch of Moby Dick, being about about 3/4 through it.  But, man, what a labor!  The story is great, but the endless and tiresome writing on whales and whaling I don't really understand.  The research Melville must have put it that is lost on most folks (I would assume) makes my head spin.   At this point two things are keeping my hanging on:
1 - I'm determined to read more classic lit
2 - I want to see how it ends
I'll let you know more when I'm done. 
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roguegnome
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« Reply #552 on: November 19, 2008, 01:31:27 PM »

Melville's "research" took the form of signing on to the whaling ship Acushnet,which was bound for the Pacific Ocean. The vessel sailed around Cape Horn and traveled to the South Pacific for an 18 month cruise. [He deserted]
Moby-Dick; my favorite book. (Although I failed to finish it in my first attempt)
The book is as much about man and his relationships and his demons, as it is about the whale.
And understand that whaling was an enormous industry in the 19th century, and it holds a vital role in our history. America excelled in this endeavor, and the UK failed repeatedly to beat them at this high risk/high stakes game. New Bedford and Nantucket are on the map today due to their whaling history.
They sailed into largely uncharted and mis-charted waters. America's "discovery" (sometime after British Captain James Cook) of the Sandwich Islands [Hawaii] and Alaska is due to the demand for cleaner, brighter lamp oil that whale oil provided to light the homes and the streetlamps in the US and as the major export to Europe.
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« Reply #553 on: November 19, 2008, 10:40:36 PM »

Melville's "research" took the form of signing on to the whaling ship Acushnet,which was bound for the Pacific Ocean. The vessel sailed around Cape Horn and traveled to the South Pacific for an 18 month cruise. [He deserted]
Moby-Dick; my favorite book. (Although I failed to finish it in my first attempt)
The book is as much about man and his relationships and his demons, as it is about the whale.
And understand that whaling was an enormous industry in the 19th century, and it holds a vital role in our history. America excelled in this endeavor, and the UK failed repeatedly to beat them at this high risk/high stakes game. New Bedford and Nantucket are on the map today due to their whaling history.
They sailed into largely uncharted and mis-charted waters. America's "discovery" (sometime after British Captain James Cook) of the Sandwich Islands [Hawaii] and Alaska is due to the demand for cleaner, brighter lamp oil that whale oil provided to light the homes and the streetlamps in the US and as the major export to Europe.
Excellent insight!  I am enjoying the book, but I only wish there were more dialogue, particularly from Captain Ahab. It peeks into some very, very interesting territory like this, and then goes back off into the ramblings about whales.  That's the hardest part for me: getting interested in the characters, only to be dragged back into the history lesson on whales.

I'm only about 8 chapters away from finishing the book now. 
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gkella
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« Reply #554 on: November 19, 2008, 11:09:50 PM »

Too Fat To Fish, Comedian Artie Lange's autobiography.
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Caleb
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« Reply #555 on: December 06, 2008, 11:56:25 PM »

Just finished:

Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

It's been a good stretch of classic lit.
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ryler
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« Reply #556 on: December 07, 2008, 12:36:55 AM »

Creature,

Your pace is amazing.  What's on deck?
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Danny
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« Reply #557 on: December 07, 2008, 04:31:21 AM »

  Just a little update on a post of mine quite a while back. My grandson finished "White Fang" and was very pleased with it. This is meaningful.  I may try a nice hardbound "Call of the Wild" next.
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« Reply #558 on: December 07, 2008, 04:09:29 PM »

On deck?

Postmillenialism: An Eschatology of Hope by Keith Mathison (somewhat boring Reformed theological stuff)
The Wages of Spin by Carl Trueman (interesting essays on culture from a Reformed theological perspective)
The Last Trail by Zane Grey
The Scarlett Letter by Nathanial Hawthorne


dependan - That is really encouraging.  I think I'm going to read White Fang in 2009 myself.  I really enjoyed The Call of the Wild.  A lot, in fact. 

Do you folks have any reading plans for 2009?  I think I'm going to continue to pursue the classic lit that I missed in my youth (lots of catching up to do!), and I also plan on trying to read all of C.S. Lewis' works.  To my knowledge there are over 60 works from his pen. It should be a great year! 

To those of you thinking of reading Moby Dick: I do recommend the book. It's very long, and probably the most laborious book I've ever read, but it's worth it.  Melville really understood the human soul and painted some very deep characters with that work.  For most folks Moby Dick is like piano lessons, they start but never finish.  It's worth the time, if for nothing else to say that you did it.  Now... how many have read War and Peace
 
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BenF
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« Reply #559 on: December 07, 2008, 05:41:40 PM »

The forum guitar discussion is coming out in hardback next week!!
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