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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 325758 times)
Caleb
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« Reply #380 on: March 21, 2008, 04:50:13 PM »

I suppose we could archive it after 25 pages or so and start What Are You Reading II. 
No way.  Like you said, duck, it's not like the pages are real anyway.

I for one have really loved the essence of this thread and I've learned a lot from the folks who've posted in it.  I've been turned on to some great books that I would have never read otherwise.  I haven't posted all the books I've read since the thread started, but I've pretty much thrown out here for all to see what hit me one way or another.  I never would have read Steinbeck if it weren't for this thread, and I really enjoyed my Steinbeck detour last year.  

I say let the thread rock and roll its way into the forum history.  If it gets to 100 pages that would be amazing.  

Anyway.....

I just got done with Donald Miller's Through Painted Deserts.  I've read Blue Like Jazz and Searching for God Knows What from him and I liked Deserts way better.  He was way more theological in Jazz and God Knows What, but in Deserts he just gave a really nice, laid back story of his travels once upon a time.  I'm not as hard on him as I once was, but I'm still not a big fan of his theology, but this was a great book, no matter what theology you lean toward.  I highly recommend it.

Also, are there any Loius L'Amour fans here?  My grandfather was a huge fan of his and collected every book L'Amour ever wrote and read them all several times.  I was at my grandmother's the other day and she suggested I give one a try. I'm not really a Western novel kind of guy, but I think it might be a good way to reconnect with my grandfather's memory a bit.  Get inside his head in a way.  He loved those books and always talked about how brilliant of a historian L'Amour was to know all the details like he did.  I grabbed a couple off the shelf, but I can't remember the titles.  I think I'll hit them over the weekend and see what all the fuss is/was about.  
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #381 on: March 21, 2008, 06:05:43 PM »

I should have added the winky thingy. Yes, as most of us realize, it's not like they're real pages.

 
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Danny
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« Reply #382 on: March 22, 2008, 02:28:16 AM »

I like the ''Hank the cowdog series'' by John Erickson Book #5 "Faded love" is riotously funny. There is an audio tape version where 2 coyotes sing ''Rotten Meat" it is funny... They are kids books now but that's not how they started. John Erickson is a real cowboy up in the Texas panhandle and he has a degree in Writing of some kind. So some of his books were just classic.  I have read some to my grandkids too.  They are good for comic relief. Danny
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jimmy buffett
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« Reply #383 on: March 22, 2008, 08:17:10 PM »

Nope - keep it going.  This has become my "go to" resource for finding interesting books that I may not have been aware of.  This is a great resource!

jimmy
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blued03r
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« Reply #384 on: March 22, 2008, 11:46:36 PM »

Nope - keep it going.  This has become my "go to" resource for finding interesting books that I may not have been aware of.  This is a great resource!

jimmy
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« Reply #385 on: March 23, 2008, 05:42:41 AM »

New to the forum, I'm current reading my International Business Law book   (i'm a student)

For fun, I'm reading this book titled Blue Like Jazz.  It's a great book, full of short stories.  Ya'll should check it out when you get the chance. 

-Harry
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Caleb
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« Reply #386 on: March 30, 2008, 04:12:37 AM »

Well, I just got finished with my first Louis L'Amour book and I didn't really enjoy it.  I wanted to check one out since my grandfather liked him so much, but I just didn't really connect that well with the style of writing.  To me the story moved along way too fast and the story just wasn't very entertaining to me.  The book was called Under the Sweetwater Rim. 

I'm currently reading The Complete Stories of Flannery O'Connor and the Ragamuffin Gospel by Brennan Manning.  I've heard much buzz over the years about Manning's book, so I wanted to check it out. 

This year's reading has been pretty good so far.  Lots of good stuff waiting in the wings too.

 
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old folky
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« Reply #387 on: March 30, 2008, 09:01:47 AM »

I've just started "Green River, Running Red" by Ann Rule.  It's about the hunt for the green river serial killer and also about the 10th book by her that I've read.  Good reading if you like that sort of thing. 
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« Reply #388 on: April 06, 2008, 07:37:13 AM »

I agree with Ducktrapper and the crowd above--keep it going until Steve shuts it down! I am learning a lot from you all!
Has anyone read the Neil Peart books? He was (is)the drummer for RUSH. I have looked at his two books and just haven't pulled the trigger.
Also, any of you bookworms finished the 20,000 Roads biography about Parsons?
I have been detoured by some magazines lately. I like most of the Acoustic Guitar Mag content, but usually read all of the Fretboard Journal. The latest has a great interview with Richard Thompson. I also like the new and improved Wired Magazine.
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #389 on: April 07, 2008, 08:05:05 PM »

Did you know that totalitarianism was originally perceived as a good thing? Progressive president, Woodrow Wilson was all for it! It can't happen here? Have you heard about "war socialism"? Did you know that fascism and bolshevism were pretty much the same thing until Stalin needed enemies? His enemies, such as super commie Leon Trotsky, were suddenly labeled fascist. Suddenly the commusnists started labeling anything they didn't like as fascist and that's pretty much how the word is used today.                 
I just finished and very much enjoyed Jonah Goldberg's Liberal Fascism. I can see some folks getting their shirts in knot over the title but it's not really saying what you may think it is, I dont think. ;)
It's about smiley faced fascism, not rounding up your enemies and invading Poland fascism. Although the ties and shared philosophies through Progressivism might be astonishing.
As a Canadian, I wasn't bothered by the partisan nature of the book but was glad to get a historical (and an easy and entertaining) view of who "invented" it. Who were their influences. Heroes? Where did they get their ideas? Who did they admire? Who admired them? For this reason it's a bit of a must read.
Goldberg's been called a fascist for being a conservative, and justifies the partisanship for this reason and the word is casually thrown around a lot by people who don't know what it actually means. One thing that struck me was the last chapter. It seems "we're all fascists now". The will to power and the urge to totalitarianism exists in everyone.
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wyodeb
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« Reply #390 on: April 13, 2008, 01:54:30 AM »

I found a couple of old book of short stories, and have been working my way through it, with detours to books by authors I've enjoyed. Biggest detours so far have been Somerset Maugham and Oscar Wilde. I gave up the computer for Lent, so have had quite a bit of extra time to read.

Deb
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #391 on: April 13, 2008, 04:31:33 AM »

I've just started 'Guitar making: Tradition and Technology' by Cumpiano and Natelson.
Also about to start the notorious 'The Stranger' by Camus.

I found a couple of old book of short stories, and have been working my way through it, with detours to books by authors I've enjoyed. Biggest detours so far have been Somerset Maugham and Oscar Wilde. I gave up the computer for Lent, so have had quite a bit of extra time to read.

Deb

What have you been reading of Maugham's? If you were to look back through the post in this thread you'd see he's one of my favorites.
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wyodeb
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« Reply #392 on: April 13, 2008, 05:58:43 AM »

Mostly short stories (I found a boxed set of his complete short stories). I really like the satirical ones best. I also like the Ashenden stories. Also The Moon and Sixpence, Cakes and Ale, and Up at the Villa. I have seen the movie "The Razor's Edge," so I haven't read that one yet. I really should read Of Human Bondage while I still am on this kick. One year I read everything of Steinbeck I could get my hands on. Once it was Ray Bradbury. I tend to do that.

Deb
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« Reply #393 on: April 14, 2008, 05:03:18 PM »

Mostly short stories (I found a boxed set of his complete short stories). I really like the satirical ones best. I also like the Ashenden stories. Also The Moon and Sixpence, Cakes and Ale, and Up at the Villa. I have seen the movie "The Razor's Edge," so I haven't read that one yet. I really should read Of Human Bondage while I still am on this kick. One year I read everything of Steinbeck I could get my hands on. Once it was Ray Bradbury. I tend to do that.

Deb

Deb, you are over my head. I thought it was just Ducktrapper and Creature, bigrin but now I see you are a bookworm as well as a guitar worm! I really didn't start reading until I got out of high school. Now, I wish my teachers would have forced me to read the classics.
This is all good stuff. I have quite a "to read" section, or maybe pile is a better word, of my room!
Speaking of...
Does anyone else use old concert tickets for bookmarks? You can get them laminated at Kinkos and they work great!
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Caleb
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« Reply #394 on: April 14, 2008, 10:45:09 PM »

Fred - I didn't "really" start reading till my 30's.  I still don't consider myself a "bookworm", but do read each day.  I've got a bro-in-law that reads 2 and 3 books a week.  Wish I could keep up with him. 
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Caleb
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« Reply #395 on: April 14, 2008, 10:48:49 PM »

. Once it was Ray Bradbury.
I did that with Steinbeck last year.  Wow, what a ride!  Bradbury's on my list as one of the next.  So many books, so little time.... 
 
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #396 on: April 14, 2008, 11:31:17 PM »

I've been a voracious reader since I was 5 or 6. No matter how many books I read though my "to read list" is always longer still. I figure maybe I'll live forever as long as there's a great novel I haven't gotten to yet. That's what I'm saving Proust for, I guess. 
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joethedestroyer
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« Reply #397 on: April 14, 2008, 11:46:16 PM »

my fiance can go on book-buying binges and think nothing of it....  going through several books each week..  and she calls this guitar habit expensive...
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Caleb
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« Reply #398 on: April 15, 2008, 12:31:28 AM »

Books can get expensive for sure.  One of the best things I ever got for myself was a library card. 
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #399 on: April 21, 2008, 09:33:49 PM »

I finished the Stranger last week sometime. It was ok, not great, not bad.

Cumpiano's 'Guitar Making' is slightly disappointing not because of the lack of info but because they use such non-mainstream methods of doing things like no body mould, pinned neck, the kerf linings are removed in sections and replaced by new sections above the braces rather than just cut out part of the lining for the brace ends.
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