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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 308684 times)
Caleb
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« Reply #240 on: October 24, 2007, 12:04:18 AM »

I'm reading Beowulf again; I needed something short to read while I wait on 'Crime and Punishment' and 'Augie March' that I ordered. The movie thats coming out (Beowulf) doesn't look too good; it sucks that movies with a lot of action usually are shallow formula films for the simple man. Btw, Beowulf and Nietzsche are really boring compared to 'East of Eden' that I recently read.
I read Beowulf earlier this year and really liked the story.  I sighed when I saw that there was a Beowulf movie coming out; when I saw flavor-of-the-week Jolie on the ad I sighed even deeper.  It'll likely just be an hour and a half of watching her cans bounce around while a great story is ripped to shreds by Hollywood.  Movies are getting pretty lame. 

East of Eden was incredible.  I even wrote a song about it recently. 
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« Reply #241 on: October 24, 2007, 01:12:07 AM »

Creature and Jeremy,  Beowolf is certainly one of the greatest stories of all time and a more subtle tale than many readers give it credit for.  After all that transpires, why does Beowolf engage in the lesser second quest?  Does hubris enter in?  Is it a plot convenience to bring the story to conclusion.  Does the likelihood of several authors effect the validity of any interpretation?  Fun stuff, at least to me, but maybe I'm just easy to please. 

Ducktrapper, going back to these great books later in life may be the best way to read them.  Simple arithmetic (uh, age) provides more experience to bring to the party.  There has to be some compensation for this damnable passage of time! 
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« Reply #242 on: October 26, 2007, 12:44:31 AM »

Anyone have suggestions for books on American music, blues, jazz, or pop?  Or favorite music biographies?

The one I'm reading now is excellent "The History of the Blues -- The Roots. The Music. The People. From Charley Patton to Robert Cray"  by Francis Davis  Hyperion Publishing  1995

I need more!

Tx, piscator
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« Reply #243 on: October 26, 2007, 04:57:02 AM »

almost done with sideways, which was turned into a (great) movie a couple years back.  it's about two (wildly different) best friends spending a week in california's wine country before one gets married.  the book is great- it reads itself, practically.  very "literate" (read: big words), though, like nabakov.  plowed through it in less than a week and am almost done.

for those of you that have only seen the movie, the book is way different.  it's almost like a pre/sequel to the film as there are so many things that go cut out or altered for the movie.  i love the movie alot though, don't get eor wrong.  when i'm done, i'll pass final judgement as to which is better.  book vs movie is a hobby of eor's.  bigrin

love,
eor

ps- the movie is on sale at target for $5 if anyone is interested.
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poki
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« Reply #244 on: October 27, 2007, 07:53:55 AM »

Lone Survivor by Marcus Luttrell.  Marcus is the lone survivor of his navy SEAL teams disastrous operation red wing mission in Afghanistan.  his account led to the post humus medal of honor award to his friend and team mate Michael Murphy recently.

The Colony: the Harrowing True story of the Exiles of Molokai by John Tyman.  traces the history of the leprosy colony on molokai and all the cruelty society dished out to those stricken by leprosy and the cruelty among the victims themselves but also the incredible sacrifice and kindness of some, in particular of Father Damien.
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« Reply #245 on: October 28, 2007, 02:15:11 AM »

Chasin' That Devil Music (Searching for the Blues) by, Gayle Dean Wardlow

This seems to be a pretty interesting read for sure, if you like learning about the who's who in the Delta Roots
comes with a CD of some real old and rare Blues songs.
it's only $19.95
ISBN # 0-87930-522-5
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« Reply #246 on: October 28, 2007, 04:15:16 AM »

SteveO, Thanks!  I'll check it out.  Exactly the kind of thing I'm looking for!
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« Reply #247 on: November 02, 2007, 05:00:37 AM »

Clapton just came out with an autobiography that's just hit the shelves and is causing quite a bit of buzz.  You may want to check it out as well.  There's bound to be some good stories in there.  I think I might read it after the buzz settles and I can score it for cheap on half.com or something or pick it up at my local library.
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« Reply #248 on: November 04, 2007, 05:41:13 AM »

Thanks Creature!  My library gets a good selection of new books.  I'll keep an eye out the next time I'm there.
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« Reply #249 on: November 04, 2007, 02:01:18 PM »


Ducktrapper, going back to these great books later in life may be the best way to read them.  Simple arithmetic (uh, age) provides more experience to bring to the party.  There has to be some compensation for this damnable passage of time! 


I couldn't imagine wading through the likes of Gravity's Rainbow, Ulysees, War and Peace, Moby Dick et al again. I pick up Finnegan's Wake and read a page or two out loud at random. I think it's the only way to read the thing. Like Jeremy mentioned though, East of Eden is just more fun than Nietsche. Anyone tried Proust?
The Turtledove books, while flawed are a great read. I love the lizards! One of the great science fiction creations of all time. 
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Caleb
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« Reply #250 on: November 04, 2007, 09:46:20 PM »

I couldn't imagine wading through the likes of Gravity's Rainbow, Ulysees, War and Peace, Moby Dick et al again.
Why not? 
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #251 on: November 05, 2007, 12:14:42 PM »

Why not? 

I know how they turn out? ;)
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« Reply #252 on: November 05, 2007, 09:20:45 PM »

Ducktrapper, that's funny!   bigrin

To each his own, read whatever turns you on! 

I only meant to suggest that age has changed my perspective on many books. 

Heck, "War and Peace" is a page-turner. 
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« Reply #253 on: November 05, 2007, 10:01:22 PM »

I have recently gotten on a kick of reading Charles de Lint. Most of his novels are considered modern urban fantasy, they deal with blending mythology from the British Isles and North America. His works also feature a backdrop of traditional music. I've been through Moonheart, Onion Girl, and Widdershins.  A few years back, I got on a similar kick reading Robertson Davies. Between my taste in literature and guitars, I feel like a misplaced Canadian. I also find myself drinking Sleeman's Cream Ale and watching Corner Gas. Can duck trapping be far behind?

John
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« Reply #254 on: November 12, 2007, 10:55:51 PM »

Just finished the latest Ian Rankin mystery - Inspector Rebus solved another one!

Cheers,
NW

 
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Caleb
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« Reply #255 on: November 13, 2007, 04:03:09 AM »

I'm working my way through most of Steinbeck's works.  I just started the Grapes of Wrath and have been going through his smaller works as well, such as the Pearl, Tortilla Flat, Cannery Row, etc.  Really good stuff.  I'm late to ther party when it comes to this stuff, but better late than never. 
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« Reply #256 on: November 13, 2007, 07:27:33 PM »

Anyone have suggestions for books on American music, blues, jazz, or pop?  Or favorite music biographies?

The one I'm reading now is excellent "The History of the Blues -- The Roots. The Music. The People. From Charley Patton to Robert Cray"  by Francis Davis  Hyperion Publishing  1995

I need more!

Tx, piscator
If you haven't done this yet, pick up "Cash" the book Johnny Cash did with a non-ghost writer. I really liked that and it left an impression on me that will never leave. 

I really liked David Crosby's second biography. In fact, I liked it so well that I decided to find his first one which is out of print. I liked Neil Young's biography as well, but it is a tougher read at the start.
I've pondered the books out by the drummer from RUSH, but I need to know if anyone has read them or not.
Also, has anyone seen these 33 1/3 books that Amazon sells? A buddy of mine loaned me one on R.E.M. and the making of the album Murmur. The books all deal with a specific album and the behind the scenes story. So far, that is pretty good.
I've also heard that the Bill Monroe biography is worth the read.

As far as non-music related books, I am reading Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle.
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« Reply #257 on: November 16, 2007, 03:01:57 PM »

Just picked up Guns, Germs & Steel and Eiger Dreams.
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« Reply #258 on: November 16, 2007, 04:38:56 PM »

I have recently gotten on a kick of reading Charles de Lint. Most of his novels are considered modern urban fantasy, they deal with blending mythology from the British Isles and North America. His works also feature a backdrop of traditional music. I've been through Moonheart, Onion Girl, and Widdershins.  A few years back, I got on a similar kick reading Robertson Davies. Between my taste in literature and guitars, I feel like a misplaced Canadian. I also find myself drinking Sleeman's Cream Ale and watching Corner Gas. Can duck trapping be far behind?

John

That's how it starts!  We're all 5th Business now.
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eor
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« Reply #259 on: November 20, 2007, 06:24:16 AM »

finished a confederacy of dunces.  i get it.  maybe you should read it, too.  very left-field.  ahead of its time, and a lot of fun.  hard to put down.

have selby's the demon waiting in the can, and just ordered the following from half.com:

one flew over the cukoo's nest - ken kesey
slaughterhouse five- kurt vonnegut
the stranger- albert camus


as you can see, eor's "reading what i should have read a long damn time ago" crusade continues.  love the movie version of "cukoo's", which i recently rewatched, so i thought i'd play another round of "book vs. movie".  new thread idea?

like hunter s. thompson, i found vonnegut through various essays, interviews,  articles and whatnot; never read any of his books.  his death rekindled eor's interest.  this is the third time i'm ordering this book, the first never made it, the second order was cancelled, and there were a few times where the browser crashed and i lost the book.

know next to nothing about the stranger, but it's one of "those" books, and i like the cure, so i decided to give it a shot.

love,
eor

the other day i spend about 3-4 hours pawing through a borders, made some notes and bought them off of half.  but my bro needed a book from there and i bought it for him, so i don't feel bad.  don't think i would have, anyway.
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