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Author Topic: books: what are you currently reading?  (Read 310539 times)
Ol Achey
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« Reply #60 on: October 17, 2006, 11:56:26 PM »

Recently finished "Year of Wonders" by Geraldine Brooks. One of the most fascinating books I've ever read, a fictional account of a historic event in 17th century England. The story portrays how a village dealt with the onslaught of the plague. A wonderfully told tale, convincing and all the more awesome because historical basis of the book actually occurred during 1655-1666 in the town of Eyam, England.

I had the privilege of attending the presentation by Geraldine Brooks and her husband Tony Horwitz a few weekends ago at the National Book Festival in DC. Both are Pulitzer winners... what a great event that was. Highly recommended.

And, Sordello -  +1 on what you said!

-- Ol Achey.

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poki
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« Reply #61 on: October 27, 2006, 05:39:49 AM »

Three Wings for the Red Barron, Von Richthofen Strategy Tactics and Airplanes by Leon Bennett.
a study of the red baron and the aeronautical physics of the various makes of triplane designs and their use in air combat.

A short History of Nearly Everything, spacial illustrated edition by Bill Bryson
pretty much as the tile implies
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« Reply #62 on: November 02, 2006, 01:23:03 AM »

A book about roofs.  If it sounds exciting let me assure you that it isn't.
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« Reply #63 on: November 04, 2006, 01:54:25 AM »

Wayne Dyer ,the power of intention,xlnt.
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Novalis
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« Reply #64 on: November 17, 2006, 06:57:04 PM »

Since I was a boy, all my money went towards records and books, so I got a relatively big library of both.

I'm currently re-reading one of the most important and life changing books of the 20th century: "Science and Sanity" by Alfred Korzybski. It was Korzybski who coined the term "the map is not the territory". This book changed the way natural scientists view, interpret, and conduct their work (I'm in the mental health field and it changed my entire outlook on the assumed "mind-body" dualism). Hard to find, won't find it in most stores, since most folks don't have the attention span to read such a long and difficult work. I know it's available on the general semantics website. Also just finished "The Fear of Life" by Alexander Lowen, the book he considered his most important.
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poki
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« Reply #65 on: November 17, 2006, 08:56:05 PM »

Shattered Sword: the untold story of the Battle of Midway. 
a new look at this epic battle between Japan and US in WWII which clarifies and exposes the ongoing myths about the battle.

The Greatest Stories Never Told
did you know the pilgrims intended landfall was Virginia but storms blew them off course so they had to make landfall in Plymouth Rock MA because they ran short of something too important to allow them more time to head back south?...it was BEER   water was too easily contaminated so beer was brought along instead...might make a good excuse if you get pulled over for DUI or better yet, don't drink and drive
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« Reply #66 on: November 17, 2006, 09:11:25 PM »

Mark Steyn - America Alone - The End of the World as We Know It.
Brilliant analysis of the times. A breezy and humourous romp through some very serious things. Hard to refute. It's the demography! I'd say if you only read one book this year, make it this one. Everything else is superfluous.
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #67 on: November 18, 2006, 02:39:42 AM »

I'm reading Faulkner's As I Lay Dying. Not sure I like the writing style. It's hard to keep up with whats going on, not due to the odd structure of the book but the dialect. If you're not familiar with the book, it is written from different characters perspectives; as if the characters wrote the book. Alot of times they will use pronouns without explaining who they are referring to.
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Caleb
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« Reply #68 on: December 20, 2006, 05:59:25 AM »

I've been reading Ben Franklin's autobiography as of late, as well as old American short stories by Washington Irving.  I have dabbled in Poe's work as of late too. Poe is a bit dark for me, interesting at the same time.  He was definitely ahead of his time.  But Ben Franklin is probably one of the most interesting people in history, in my opinion. A truly brilliant mind.
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Ratishna
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« Reply #69 on: December 21, 2006, 01:44:20 AM »

Franklin, a true ladies' man if there ever was one.
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #70 on: December 21, 2006, 02:32:24 AM »

I'm reading "The Moon and Sixpence" ~ Maugham
I've already said it, but he's my favorite writer.
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Caleb
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« Reply #71 on: December 21, 2006, 02:35:15 AM »

jeremy - you ever read any Don DeLillo?
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #72 on: December 21, 2006, 02:52:31 AM »

jeremy - you ever read any Don DeLillo?

Nope. I read mostly "classics", I guess is what you'd call them. I think most of what I read is the kinda literature they teach in Lit. courses, cause I don't read much non-fiction or modern books. The last modern book I read was "wild at Heart" I believe, that was awhile ago. But I'm not opposed to reading outside that scope. Why do you ask? Have you read any Somerset Maugham?
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Caleb
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« Reply #73 on: December 21, 2006, 04:10:30 AM »

Nope. I read mostly "classics", I guess is what you'd call them. I think most of what I read is the kinda literature they teach in Lit. courses, cause I don't read much non-fiction or modern books. The last modern book I read was "wild at Heart" I believe, that was awhile ago. But I'm not opposed to reading outside that scope. Why do you ask? Have you read any Somerset Maugham?
I ask because you seem like a pretty creative person....at least that's what I gather from your writing style here when you post and the things that you seem interested in, musically. DeLillo is sort of a writer for creative writers. guess I just had a gut feeling that you may be a fan of his. 

I've not read Maugham...matter of fact, this is my first time hearing of him. what kind of stories does he write? 

isn't "wild at heart" a John Eldridge book?  some young guys (younger than me) have read it and were pretty excited about it. don't take this the wrong way, but when something is purchased from a Christian bookstore I usually shy away.  too much flavor-of-the-week thinking for my lame vanilla taste. but it may be a great book...I really don't know.  when it comes to Christian authors, I favor AW Tozer.
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #74 on: December 21, 2006, 05:34:54 AM »

I ask because you seem like a pretty creative person....at least that's what I gather from your writing style here when you post and the things that you seem interested in, musically. DeLillo is sort of a writer for creative writers. guess I just had a gut feeling that you may be a fan of his. 

I've not read Maugham...matter of fact, this is my first time hearing of him. what kind of stories does he write? 

isn't "wild at heart" a John Eldridge book?  some young guys (younger than me) have read it and were pretty excited about it. don't take this the wrong way, but when something is purchased from a Christian bookstore I usually shy away.  too much flavor-of-the-week thinking for my lame vanilla taste. but it may be a great book...I really don't know.  when it comes to Christian authors, I favor AW Tozer.

oh, well I certainly read creative writers. I may check him out. Maugham was a British writer from the early 20th century. His stories were I think at the root, stories about the human condition and how their minds' work. He is great at describing personalities and what makes people tick.

"wild at heart" is John Eldridge. It was totally not my usually reading material, but I did like it. It was flavor of the week for awhile, I saw a few kids carrying it around at college. (who knew they could really read  bigrin ,of course they could have been carrying it just to look hip)
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Caleb
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« Reply #75 on: December 21, 2006, 05:40:04 AM »

of course they could have been carrying it just to look hip
this is the main reason I don't go into the Christian book store.  They may as well rename most sections of the store "this is the section to get the stuff that makes you look cool and like you are a real thinker of the times and that you take things seriously and have a desire to learn/grow/influence the masses while looking hip, cool, neat, and holy"

sorry....guess that was a rant. 

back on topic.......

I plan to focus on early American writing throughout '07.  I should like our modern times even less when I'm done.

 





 
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poki
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« Reply #76 on: December 21, 2006, 05:53:18 AM »

when i eventually finish Shattered Sword, the untold story of the battle of midway my next books are

Apollo 13 by Jim Lovell and Jefrey Kluger
Comm Check the final flight of Shuttle Columbia by Michael Cabbage and Willam Harwood

Shattered Sword is turning out to be an extremely detailed and fascinating look at the midway battle from the japanese perspective but it delves into the minutia so is slow reading.  
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« Reply #77 on: December 21, 2006, 04:52:50 PM »

 afro

Re-reading Into thin air-john krakauer
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bob_d
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« Reply #78 on: December 23, 2006, 10:19:07 PM »

The Iraq Study Group Report.
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magnummic
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« Reply #79 on: December 25, 2006, 03:51:43 AM »

Jeremy3220, Sorry I did not get back to you. I am a literature teacher and have enkoyed the list of books that you have been citing. I also thought As I Lay Dying was a bit difficult to follow, but I think that was Faulkner's vibe. You need to check out The Sound and the Fury. It is told from four different points of view and one of them is of a mentally challenged child. I still haven't figured out much of the plot. Thanks for the interesting list, though. I'm going to be off to the library soon. Have a good holiday.
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