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 1 
 on: Today at 03:51:28 AM 
Started by DaveyO - Last post by rockstar_not
In the late 90's/early 2000's our church had a subscription to Worship Leader magazine.  I recall seeing exactly one acoustic guitar brand advertised in that magazine:  Taylor.

In fact, I can't recall any other instrument, period, being marketed in that magazine.  No keyboards, no other guitars.  I would not be surprised, if the magazine still exists, that Taylor has continued advertising in it.

Since early 2000's I have had a side gig doing A/V instruction and training for a company called Portable Church Industries - they help churches that are meeting in rented spaces do worship services every week.

I have been in probably 50 different churches over that time; most of which have had at least one acoustic guitar in the band.  I lost track of how many Taylor branded Grand Auditorium shaped and to a lesser extent, Dreads, and even a couple T-hybrids.  I've never seen a Larry.  There was even one church where the guy had a 'zagerized' cheapo dread.  But not a single Larry.

Our worship pastor that just took another role after 2+ years at our church had an L-05 and then bought a Gibson J-45, which had to be returned due to intonation issues - eventually got it back and he played that more than the Larry.  He also had a PRS gold-top that was heavier than my Ibanez SR655 5-string bass.

My Taylor in my signature line was free to me.  Won in a drawing, believe it or not.  Hated playing it until I fixed a string spacing issue with the nut.  Now, when I'm playing out and have to plug into a PA, I actually prefer it over my Larry with a Mini Pure Western K+K pup.  The Taylor has a cutout and my Larry doesn't and I've been able to tweak a patch in my Zoom G5 processor so that it sounds VERY close to mic'ed.

As to the electrics, particularly the Strat-o-Vée and Tele-Vée (I don't remember the model names), they had to compete in a market with thousands of other brands selling strat and tele shaped guitars, let alone Fender.  You have to REALLY stand-out with tone, quality, etc. to gain a reputation to drive sales; which my understanding the Larry's are; but dang that's a hard market to compete in.  Even G&L resorted to getting their stuff made overseas.  I know that the Tele-Vée had a belly and fore-arm cut, compensated saddles, custom wound pups, etc. but how does average Joe, or even high-dollar Joe ever find out about that?  High Dollar Joe's first choice is going to be an American strat for a Tele.  Average Joe is gonna go for a Squier or if he's feeling a little on the self-pampering side might spring the extra $150 for a MIM.  Larrivée even copied the spaghetti font of Fender on at least one of those models.  If you are gonna fake the logo, why wouldn't joe buyer just go for a Fender - the real-deal?

That said, when I got really fortunate on a Saturday in Cali and drove up to Oxnard, just to see if I could dumpster-dive and get a piece of scrap wood and ended up getting a personal tour of the Oxnard facility by none-other than Jean himself, he gave a high compliment to Bob Taylor when he was showing me the CNC machine where they rough-cut the necks.  Jean said that Bob Taylor showed him how to implement CNC for cutting necks.  He didn't have to say that, and I didn't ask when he started using CNC, Jean came right out with it.

My Epiphone in my signature has incredible build quality and tone variety and sustain for ages.  I have two complaints with it: I wish it had a forearm bevel, and the push/pull tone knob that taps the humbuckers, has developed a case of the statics!  But other than that, it's a better strat than a strat, with the glued in neck and tilt-back headstock and weighs very little - like an SG instead of an LP.  That model, however, never really caught on in Gibson, nor Epiphone brand - cuz it's not an LP, or ES-335, or SG, etc.  Simply killer guitar, but not a popular model.

My next electric is gonna be a franken-strat-Dano.  Squier strat body and neck that I've dressed frets, smoothed out finish, etc. with a custom made pickguard and dan-o-lectric lipstick tube pups with switchable series/parallel wiring, switchable tone caps, both pups slanted to match the angle of the top of a typical strat pickguard, knobs in-line with tail pup, etc.  I'm about 1/3 way done with it.

After that, I'm probably gonna go for one of Eastwood/Airline's crazier models.  Might even spring for a Backlund.  https://eastwoodguitars.com/collections/backlund  The Katalina model with the slanted Dano pups is sort of where I'm going with the Squier project, but with more steep angle to the pups.

 2 
 on: Today at 03:02:47 AM 
Started by DaveyO - Last post by B0WIE
I don't know where people get the idea that Gibson is some sort of large manufacturer of acoustics.
Well... Because they are a major name, available in many major stores and online retailers than Larrivee, and everyone has heard of them whereas Larrivee is an, "Oh, I think I heard of them" brand.

It's not unreasonable for people to think of Gibson as being a bigger acoustic brand than Larrivee.

 3 
 on: Today at 01:45:09 AM 
Started by fitness1 - Last post by fitness1
Drop to 185 shipped - heck of a deal!

 4 
 on: Today at 01:31:50 AM 
Started by Zissou Intern - Last post by flatlander
As you know I have D-40R with Moon wood and it has that perfect mix of more bass but still balanced with the Larrivee sound. I really like the moon wood. I have it on a parlor too. Or maybe it's just called Alpine spruce from same area, but anyway both guitars have the same responsive qualities that are certainly coming from the wood on top.

 5 
 on: Today at 01:29:46 AM 
Started by DaveyO - Last post by AZLiberty
Where did you get this information? I'm not trying to question it, but I'd like a source, because it doesn't seem likely to me.


One of the interviews with Ren Ferguson.  He let slip that Montana was making 200 instruments total a week. (that includes mandolins).

Gibson's US acoustic production is tiny.  8000-10,000 a year.  They sell a lot of electrics and crate after crate of imports under their Epiphone line.  I don't know where people get the idea that Gibson is some sort of large manufacturer of acoustics.

The wildcard for #3 would be Cordoba/Guild if they can ever get their act together with their California Factory. (and convince people to pay Martin Prices for Guilds)

 6 
 on: Today at 01:23:12 AM 
Started by DaveyO - Last post by flatlander
I guess my perspective is a little different. I got my first Larrivee in 1980. Talk about no one knowing about them in U.S.! For next 10 years I saw 2 others and heard almost nothing about them except for some ads and articles in the old Frets magazine. So from 1600 guitars or so made over the first 13 years (going by my serial#) to 150,000 + or however many they've made now they are steadily growing. More importantly, quality and popularity and not the same. Beyond that they do generally have a different sound than has been traditional in U.S. and they, it seems to me, have for the most part stuck to their idea of making balanced clear voiced guitars.

 7 
 on: October 23, 2018, 05:07:53 PM 
Started by DaveyO - Last post by rosborn
Where did you get this information? I'm not trying to question it, but I'd like a source, because it doesn't seem likely to me.

Gibson is selling a LOT of acoustics these days. My favorite mom & pop shop is an acoustic dealer for Martin, Taylor, Gibson, Alvarez, Ibanez, Fender, Epiphone,  Yamaha and even Larrivee. They won't order Larrivees anymore, because they sit on the wall too long (lack of name brand recognition in the Midwest - even though this is a music town). But he has at least a dozen Gibsons hanging on the wall right now (and usually a dozen Martins and that many Taylors).

I am pretty sure Elderly, in Lansing, MI, has adopted the same business “model” regarding Larrivee. Elderly has used Larrivees but no new ones.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

 8 
 on: October 23, 2018, 04:30:31 PM 
Started by DaveyO - Last post by Mikeymac

Gibson and Larrivee make about the same amount.  Really depends on how badly Gibson's Montana site is doing on a given week, but they average 200 guitars a week. 


Where did you get this information? I'm not trying to question it, but I'd like a source, because it doesn't seem likely to me.

Gibson is selling a LOT of acoustics these days. My favorite mom & pop shop is an acoustic dealer for Martin, Taylor, Gibson, Alvarez, Ibanez, Fender, Epiphone,  Yamaha and even Larrivee. They won't order Larrivees anymore, because they sit on the wall too long (lack of name brand recognition in the Midwest - even though this is a music town). But he has at least a dozen Gibsons hanging on the wall right now (and usually a dozen Martins and that many Taylors).

 9 
 on: October 23, 2018, 01:55:17 PM 
Started by maplebaby - Last post by maplebaby
very nice...i couldn't do that if i had to! I'm 'assuming' you bevel them or not?  I think it's awesome you can custom make your own picks - i of course have to pay for mine:(


 

 10 
 on: October 23, 2018, 01:58:38 AM 
Started by morrow22 - Last post by 247hoopsfan
It's a tough choice for my favorite.  The JCL 40th Anniversary really shines .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vevdm7eU4S4
But my D10 Brazilian just sounds awesome too.  Even though it is a dread, it does have 1 3/4" nut, so it is very suitable to finger style.
https://soundcloud.com/247hoopsfan/parsley-sage-rosemary-thyme

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