Larrivee Guitar Forum

Main Forums => Larrivee Electric Guitars => Topic started by: rockstar_not on May 24, 2010, 12:28:42 AM



Title: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: rockstar_not on May 24, 2010, 12:28:42 AM
I'm a hard-tail Fender fan.  However, I also love my L-03.  I've never got on with tune-o-matic/Gibson type bridges.  The only Gibson I've played that I really enjoyed was a Gibson Nighthawk.  I know that this keeps me from enjoying a big part of the electric guitar world, but that's the way that it is for me.  I don't like a big vertical change between where my palm rests on the saddle pieces and the top of the guitar.

So, is there any chance that Larrivee would consider a stop tail or at least lower profile bridge for people like me?

Anyone else out there that won't consider an RS-4 because of the bridge?


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: bel on May 24, 2010, 01:48:54 AM
what are some of the bridges you do like? give a few examples. Are you wanting something crazy like a floyd, or just something different like a hipshot?


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: rockstar_not on May 24, 2010, 12:53:43 PM
what are some of the bridges you do like? give a few examples. Are you wanting something crazy like a floyd, or just something different like a hipshot?

Just a good old Fender strat bridge works fine for me; I usually lock them down with extra springs, but that low-profile, without the sharp edges on the saddle pieces, is what I like.

This, of course, means that the pups are nearly flush with the top of the guitar as well.

-Scott


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: ducktrapper on May 25, 2010, 02:29:54 PM
I love a nice strat too but there's good reasons why a nice Les Paul or RS-4 or other high quality LP-ish guitars cost a lot more. I just glanced at my RS-4 and then my strat and I can't see it myself. The strat bridge is all about the use of the whammy bar, isn't it? If you're locking down the bar, I don't get why you'd want one on an RS-4. I can't imagine Larrivée is going there anytime soon. I would think they may introduce some strat-like guitars first. You would probably have a better shot, getting the hardware and doing the switch yourself. I'm tempted to say, just play a strat. So I just did.  :winkin:
That's why I have more than one electric guitar.  :smile:   


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: JOYCEfromNS on May 25, 2010, 04:39:32 PM
Rockstar seems to be a true Fenderite the Palm feel is big with the Fenders. Have kinda wondered fror years why Gibson angles the neck and doesn't just contour the the top making the bridge right into the top with just adjustable metal inserts on the contoured bridge instead of a towering mass of metal to compensate for the neck angle.

Take the neck angle out make a contoured bridge carved out of the top with low mass saddles installed in the contoured bridge. IMHO you would have a nicer looking guitar, better sounding because of the wood and a better feeling for the palm easier to play and likely more attractive to strat lovers such as Rockstar. My two cents.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: ducktrapper on May 25, 2010, 06:58:33 PM
Rockstar seems to be a true Fenderite the Palm feel is big with the Fenders. Have kinda wondered fror years why Gibson angles the neck and doesn't just contour the the top making the bridge right into the top with just adjustable metal inserts on the contoured bridge instead of a towering mass of metal to compensate for the neck angle.

Take the neck angle out make a contoured bridge carved out of the top with low mass saddles installed in the contoured bridge. IMHO you would have a nicer looking guitar, better sounding because of the wood and a better feeling for the palm easier to play and likely more attractive to strat lovers such as Rockstar. My two cents.

Well, the simple answer is, that would be a different guitar. I'm comfortable enough when, at times, I rest my palm on a tune-o-matic bridge. Then again, I've got a big ol' hunk of callous around seven o'clock on my lower right palm.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: JOYCEfromNS on May 25, 2010, 10:19:29 PM
Well, the simple answer is, that would be a different guitar.

Yup!!!

Maybe the simple question could be why do LP styles angle the neck thus requiring the towering mass of metal :? As in my limitations of guitar building theory there seems to be a relatively simple way around it. I'm the 1st to admit I must be missing something :? Any ideas?? Simple please BUT maybe not quite as simple as The Ducks :smile:


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Mikeymac on May 25, 2010, 10:40:12 PM
Yup!!!

Maybe the simple question could be why do LP styles angle the neck thus requiring the towering mass of metal :?

I think the simple answer is that the Les Paul is the next step in the evolution of Gibson's big jazz guitars, which had tall bridges and angled necks! Then someone got smart and came up with the tune-o-matic bridge to correct intonation problems - add a solid body, now you're in Les Paul territory.

Leo started from a totally different place with the Tele (and remember, the Tele - or "Telly" as it used to be abbreviated in the old days - predates the Les Paul by a couple years)...he wanted to make a very practical guitar that could be amplified without feedback, and easily fixed if the neck warped. Not being a guitar player himself, Leo probably wasn't too worried about that whole jazz box neck angle thing...


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: rockstar_not on May 26, 2010, 03:48:36 AM
Rockstar seems to be a true Fenderite the Palm feel is big with the Fenders. Have kinda wondered fror years why Gibson angles the neck and doesn't just contour the the top making the bridge right into the top with just adjustable metal inserts on the contoured bridge instead of a towering mass of metal to compensate for the neck angle.

Take the neck angle out make a contoured bridge carved out of the top with low mass saddles installed in the contoured bridge. IMHO you would have a nicer looking guitar, better sounding because of the wood and a better feeling for the palm easier to play and likely more attractive to strat lovers such as Rockstar. My two cents.

Palm feel is it - it feels much more like an acoustic, actually - to me.  I realize that not everyone will agree with me on this.

If you grew up playing electric on a Fender like bridge (actually my first electric axe was a Peavey Milestone; think of a T-60 Peavey but in a Strat-like body).  The move to the Strat was easy for me - just a little more narrow fretboard, but much more tonal variety (mine is a Fat-Strat that I've rewired somewhat to give a master tone control and a variable tap on the bridge humbucker).  I've also put graph-tec saddles on the thing - haven't broken a string at the bridge ever again.

Every time I try a tune-o-matic bridged guitar, it just feels like my hand is suspended out in space without the reassurance of the top of the guitar right there at the ready.  And most tune-o-matic saddles are simply sharp on the palm - ouch; completely unnecessary! 

Now some of you are probably shaking your head and saying 'get used to it' or something to that effect, but I see arguments about the merits of 1/8" difference in neck width and so forth on the acoustic side of this board without any criticism.

I would love to have a Larrivee quality electric, with Fender style design as it pertains to the bridge and distance from the top of the guitar.  Plain and simple.  I would think there is just as many electric players that take a shine to this type of design as there are tune-o-matic players; perhaps even more.  Who can really say?

Oh, there was a comment about the 'whammy bar' as being what the strat is all about.  Not to me.  I bend my notes with my fretting hand, thank you very much.  If there were more hard-tail strats on the market, I probably would have bought one instead of the trem-bridge that I have.  It's also about body contour.  A strat hangs just right on me, belly scoop and all!

Anyway, I'm probably asking this question in the wrong place - I should be asking at the Larrivee site itself.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: JOYCEfromNS on May 26, 2010, 04:38:58 AM
Palm feel is it - it feels much more like an acoustic, actually - to me.  I realize that not everyone will agree with me on this.


Every time I try a tune-o-matic bridged guitar, it just feels like my hand is suspended out in space without the reassurance of the top of the guitar right there at the ready.  And most tune-o-matic saddles are simply sharp on the palm - ouch; completely unnecessary! 

Now some of you are probably shaking your head and saying 'get used to it' or something to that effect, but I see arguments about the merits of 1/8" difference in neck width and so forth on the acoustic side of this board without any criticism.

I would love to have a Larrivee quality electric, with Fender style design as it pertains to the bridge and distance from the top of the guitar.  Plain and simple.  I would think there is just as many electric players that take a shine to this type of design as there are tune-o-matic players; perhaps even more.  Who can really say?

Anyway, I'm probably asking this question in the wrong place - I should be asking at the Larrivee site itself.

Rockstar my use of the term palm feel was not meant to offend or degrade it's just what we call it my parts of the world - neither good nor bad. My brother is the opposite - he hates the fenders always inadvertently hitting the control knobs as he grew up on Gibsons.

I think it is a great topic and you are in the right place.  Tho this is mainly an acoustic forum because lets face it Larrivee was built on the foundation of their acoustics. BUT the electric guitar division at Larrivee I believe will be all the acoustic is and more and Matt LARRIVEE will be held in as high regard in the guitar world as Jean.

I believe as I stated in previous posts that Larrivee will eventually make a fender style as their Gibby styles are just that good and they are not stupid - a large percentage of the population/market prefer the fender feel and sound over the Gibby like yourself and then there is another large percentage who feel like my bro. I know if Larrivee does make a a fender style I will be 1st in line to get my hands on it. My Jeff Beck Custom Shop may very well gather a little dust. I sincerely believe that Larrivee make the best all around solid body electric guitar today I hope they venture to a strat or tele style.

Don't recall someone stating for you to just get use to it tho :? You will get guys like The Duck who can easily transition from Gibby to Fender and back without skipping a beat - hate those guys  :humour:

Interesting thread - certainly in a section of the forum that has a lot of upside


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: JOYCEfromNS on May 26, 2010, 04:51:59 AM
I think the simple answer is that the Les Paul is the next step in the evolution of Gibson's big jazz guitars, which had tall bridges and angled necks! Then someone got smart and came up with the tune-o-matic bridge to correct intonation problems - add a solid body, now you're in Les Paul territory.

Leo started from a totally different place with the Tele (and remember, the Tele - or "Telly" as it used to be abbreviated in the old days - predates the Les Paul by a couple years)...he wanted to make a very practical guitar that could be amplified without feedback, and easily fixed if the neck warped. Not being a guitar player himself, Leo probably wasn't too worried about that whole jazz box neck angle thing...

Rev very interesting theory - thus even tho they came after the Tele they were based on "older" technology. I never thought of it that way. Wonder if my suggestion could work and what the end result would be :?


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: ducktrapper on May 26, 2010, 12:01:35 PM
Rockstar - "The strat bridge is all about the use of the whammy bar, isn't it?" Not quite the same as saying that playing a strat is all about the whammy. Anyway, I've hardtailed my strat, as well, but the strat bridge is a lot about a workable whammy bar and keeping the guitar in tune.
Hate me all you want but I'm a switch hitter on guitar. Well, except for not playing left handed, that is.  :laughin:


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Mikeymac on May 26, 2010, 03:56:34 PM
Tho this is mainly an acoustic forum because lets face it Larrivee was built on the foundation of their acoustics. BUT the electric guitar division at Larrivee I believe will be all the acoustic is and more and Matt LARRIVEE will be held in as high regard in the guitar world as Jean.

I believe as I stated in previous posts that Larrivee will eventually make a fender style as their Gibby styles are just that good and they are not stupid - a large percentage of the population/market prefer the fender feel and sound over the Gibby like yourself and then there is another large percentage who feel like my bro.

I'm not so sure about Larrivee eventually making a Fender style guitar...even though they made Fender "shaped" guitars back in the '80's. You mentioned Matthew and Jean above, alluding to the evolution from the father to the son - and acoustic to electric - but this is exactly my point about the Les Paul. Gibson started out (as did Martin and other companies) as an ACOUSTIC guitar company, and their electrics evolved from their acoustics. Larrivee has not ignored their heritage in making the new RS-4 guitar; it's an extention of their acoustics: the body design looks like an evolution of the LV acoustic body, and the set neck and headstock follow very much in their acoustic tradition.

I suspect that Matthew might feel that building a bolt-on Strat style guitar would be "devolution," or to put it crassly, beneath Larrivee's level of skill and old world craftsmanship...Leo Fender had no such qualms.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Barefoot Rob on May 26, 2010, 04:41:12 PM
Though I prefer a simple wrap a round bridge/tailpiece on Gibson type guitars I've never had a problem muting either style.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: ducktrapper on May 26, 2010, 06:26:17 PM
I'm not so sure about Larrivee eventually making a Fender style guitar...even though they made Fender "shaped" guitars back in the '80's. You mentioned Matthew and Jean above, alluding to the evolution from the father to the son - and acoustic to electric - but this is exactly my point about the Les Paul. Gibson started out (as did Martin and other companies) as an ACOUSTIC guitar company, and their electrics evolved from their acoustics. Larrivee has not ignored their heritage in making the new RS-4 guitar; it's an extention of their acoustics: the body design looks like an evolution of the LV acoustic body, and the set neck and headstock follow very much in their acoustic tradition.

I suspect that Matthew might feel that building a bolt-on Strat style guitar would be "devolution," or to put it crassly, beneath Larrivee's level of skill and old world craftsmanship...Leo Fender had no such qualms.

I wouldn't totally bet against it. There are some precedents.  :smile:


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Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Mikeymac on May 26, 2010, 08:52:22 PM
I wouldn't totally bet against it. There are some precedents.  :smile:

Gotcha, duck ... but that was back in the pedal to the metal '80's. That guitar, along with some of the others Larrivee made at the time, reflected the market, which was heavy into metal and shred styles. I doubt they'll go back there again, and while that guitar has a Tele shape, it's not a bolt-on neck. It DOES have a flat bridge on it...but that was because many of these guitars had either Kahlers or Floyds on them, with a hardtail as an option.  I have my doubts that Larrivee will go there again.

If they prove me wrong, cool!  :thumb


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: JOYCEfromNS on May 26, 2010, 09:57:02 PM
Time of course will tell. I just hope Larrivee spreads the luv to include those like Rockstar who have a preference for the Fender style.

I'm convinced like they did with the current RS 4 a new fender style will be everything and more to that style line. I see electric as a real growth potential for Larrivee as they are just too good at it for it not to be. Their marketing and endorsement side of business if it ever catches up to their building ability/quality will IMHO make Matt Larrivee a household name in the electric guitar world.

My $$$$ or  :donut :donut2 is on expansion way too good at building electrics not to.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: rockstar_not on May 27, 2010, 03:52:42 AM
Rockstar - "The strat bridge is all about the use of the whammy bar, isn't it?" Not quite the same as saying that playing a strat is all about the whammy. Anyway, I've hardtailed my strat, as well, but the strat bridge is a lot about a workable whammy bar and keeping the guitar in tune.
Hate me all you want but I'm a switch hitter on guitar. Well, except for not playing left handed, that is.  :laughin:

No hate intended.  It is just a surprise to me that there aren't more folks chiming in that there are merits to a Fender style that eclipse Gibson style in some ways.  I think you do have to admit that the bridge profile is much lower on a Fender style bridge than a tune-o-matic.

And I'm not saying playing Gibson style can't be done, like they can't be palm muted, etc.  I stated no such thing.  I've played an SG for goodness sakes and I liked it somewhat, but was pining for a lower profile bridge without sharp saddles the entire time I was playing it.

The comments about 'devolution' are pretty funny.  Two different guitars for two different purposes.  Still nothing like the quack of a strat in switch positions 2 and 4.

-Scott


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: ducktrapper on May 28, 2010, 04:24:47 PM
Of course, there are still old style RS-4s and such out there. Maybe you can track one of those down. Well worth your effort.

(http://www.electricguitartrends.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/larrivee-rs-4-1980s.png)


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: rockstar_not on June 03, 2010, 12:03:46 AM
Of course, there are still old style RS-4s and such out there. Maybe you can track one of those down. Well worth your effort.

(http://www.electricguitartrends.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/larrivee-rs-4-1980s.png)

Yes, but I like the rootbeer burst finish, and could do without the pointy headstock!  Imagine a rootbeer burst on a nice strat-like shape, with a more traditional looking headstock - something you couldn't put an eye out with.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Barefoot Rob on June 03, 2010, 01:37:17 AM
Maybe a set neck tele type with a 3 on a side standard Larrivee headstock. :nice guitar:


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: JOYCEfromNS on June 03, 2010, 03:00:11 AM
Maybe a set neck tele type with a 3 on a side standard Larrivee headstock. :nice guitar:

 :thumb


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: bel on June 03, 2010, 03:26:22 AM
I dont know if 3-on-a-side tele would fly. I think there is a very limited group of people that would buy that. Tele players have it in thier head what a tele should look like. You mention tele and people think 1952 blackguard. my gut says to me that they average tele player is willing to invest in a tele better than the standard fender offering, but that it has to look similar albeit not exactly the same. 3 on a side is just sacrilage to many of those players. What i would really like to see an accurate 50's body with a good vintage style three saddle bridge and awsome bridge pickup, and bakelite pickguard. If I really had my wish, a mini bucker in the neck.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: JOYCEfromNS on June 03, 2010, 04:07:29 AM
Did someone say mini in the neck :drool:  :drool:  :drool:

Dare to Dream!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Barefoot Rob on June 03, 2010, 12:41:36 PM
Bel I am your basic tele player and I assembled a tele for a friend and did a three on a side everything else was tele.3 saddle bridge a pair of Fralin SP's{basically a P90 in the shape of standard tele pu's}.I'm thing I've got a body sittin here and another 3 on the side neck,I may need to make another one.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Mikeymac on June 03, 2010, 05:37:26 PM
Bel I am your basic tele player and I assembled a tele for a friend and did a three on a side everything else was tele.
3 saddle bridge a pair of Fralin SP's{basically a P90 in the shape of standard tele pu's}.I'm thing I've got a body sittin here and another 3 on the side neck,I may need to make another one.

Pics?


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Barefoot Rob on June 03, 2010, 05:50:55 PM
As soon as I put it together. :thumb


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: rockstar_not on June 04, 2010, 03:39:29 AM
Well, I'll take the tune-o-matic bridge over a 3-saddle tele bridge, so pretending that my vote counts - I say 'no way' to the 3 saddle arrangement. :yak:

I'm all for tradition when tradition seems to offer a technically superior solution or even a more beautiful solution - maybe it's just me, but I see no reason to hinder this alternative to the tune-o-matic with a 3 saddle arrangement.

Set neck - check
mini bucker in the neck - check
Body style tele (as long as it's a belly-tele)  - check
root beer burst finish - check
3 on a side or 6 on a side tuners - no preference
3 saddle bridge - wrong answer, back to the drawing board for me




Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Barefoot Rob on June 04, 2010, 12:42:44 PM
rockstar sorry to no 3 saddle bridge.Its what make's a tele a tele in my book.But to each his own.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: bel on June 04, 2010, 02:39:02 PM
To me there are a few things that "make" a tele a tele. The primary one is the bridge pickup and its interaction with the steel bridge. The pickup itself actually magnetized about 1/2" of the bridge greatly enlarging the magnetic apeture of the pickup. I personally believe this is part of the reason for the twang. The neck pickup is someone useless to be as it is under powered, and choked by its brass cover.

Can I ask what you dont like about the 3 saddle bridge?


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Mikeymac on June 04, 2010, 03:09:48 PM
The "compensated" 3 saddle bridges do a good job of addressing your concern: I put one on my son's Warmoth Tele that I built for him, and it intonates very well.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Barefoot Rob on June 04, 2010, 03:10:41 PM
Funny thing Bel I play mostly neck pu.Having both 6 and 3 saddle bridge's on my main tele what I found was that the 6 saddle took away all that made a tele and made it a strat.

 :cop: :cop: :cop:WARNING ABOUT TO MAKE A SEXIST COMPARISON,NOT MEANT TO OFFEND,PLEASE FORGIVE. :cop: :cop: :cop:

Strat or 6 saddle bridge's are like that really sweet girl that say's it ok baby I can keep those mistake's covered up.

Tele 3 saddle bridge's are the girl that say's you need to work this me to get what you want.....

I hope this make's some sort of sence.Its the secret sauce to me.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: ducktrapper on June 04, 2010, 05:09:38 PM
How about a couple of analogies? They're sometimes helpful.   

Tune-o-matic = M-16.
Tele bridge = AK47.

tune-o-matic = Yamaha XS650.
tele = Triumph Bonneville

tune-o-matic = inline skates
tele = strap on skates

 :whistling:



Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Barefoot Rob on June 04, 2010, 09:44:01 PM
Duck more like tune-a-matic=inline skates
                     tele=bare feet


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Mikeymac on June 04, 2010, 10:34:47 PM
Duck more like tune-a-matic=inline skates
                     tele=bare feet

 :roll

 :thumbsup :thumb :thumbsup :thumb


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: cke on June 04, 2010, 10:58:04 PM
How about a couple of analogies? They're sometimes helpful.   

Tune-o-matic = M-16.
Tele bridge = AK47.

tune-o-matic = Yamaha XS650.
tele = Triumph Bonneville

tune-o-matic = inline skates
tele = strap on skates

 :whistling:


Sounds fascinating... I wish I had the foggiest idea what this meant? :roll


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: ducktrapper on June 04, 2010, 11:15:15 PM
Duck more like tune-a-matic=inline skates
                     tele=bare feet

Pa dum bum! Good one Rob!  :laughin:


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Barefoot Rob on June 05, 2010, 02:19:12 AM
Whats also funny since I was 18 I have played all bar gigs barefooted.I also started playing tele's then.

I should clear this up a little when performing I take off my fuzzy slippers and play barefooted.this is a great help in playing MIDI,since I'm not smart enough to program the MIDI unit so all I have to do is step on a pedal to change programs I use my bid toe on use the spin wheel to scroll from program to program.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: rockstar_not on June 05, 2010, 03:44:05 AM
To me there are a few things that "make" a tele a tele. The primary one is the bridge pickup and its interaction with the steel bridge. The pickup itself actually magnetized about 1/2" of the bridge greatly enlarging the magnetic apeture of the pickup. I personally believe this is part of the reason for the twang. The neck pickup is someone useless to be as it is under powered, and choked by its brass cover.

Can I ask what you dont like about the 3 saddle bridge?

First of all - I'm not necessarily asking for a Tele, but something other than tune-o-matic.  I didn't realize there were compensated 3 saddle bridges.  If so, then that does ease some concerns.

The only tele I liked playing was a Thinline with the semi-hollow body and buckers.  I'm not a chickin' pickin fan - mainly because I can't play that way - I like to hear it now and then, but I wouldn't pay for a Larry Tele just for that twang sound.



Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Barefoot Rob on June 05, 2010, 01:41:47 PM
I'm not a chicken picker either.I use it for all style's of music.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: rockstar_not on June 05, 2010, 03:01:20 PM
I'm not a chicken picker either.I use it for all style's of music.

I realize more than just that style can be played on a Tele - but roll back to my opening post - I'm asking for a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic bridge.  Somewhere here on page 2, it turned into 'make a Larry Tele'.

That's not necessarily what I'm looking for - In fact the narrow neck of most teles is a little hard for me to play.  Gibson SG neck width and thickness - set neck, Strat-like body, Some buckers with coil tapping, and strings not suspended way off the body of the guitar like with a tune-o-matic bridge, root-beer burst finish, some cream accents on bindings/hardware, voila!

-Scott


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: ducktrapper on June 05, 2010, 03:19:33 PM
My LT-1 is a killer little guitar. It may look like a tele but it's not much like my tele except for body shape.   



Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Barefoot Rob on June 05, 2010, 04:15:49 PM
Hey the tele was just a suggestion on my part.As pretty as the RS4 is the body style is not my glass of scotch.I'm sure that the gang at Larrivee will come up with a second body design that will appeal to those that the RS4 doesn't.For me its a tele type,which isn't for all.Myself I prefer simple bridge systems,tele 3 saddle's and simple wrap-a-rounds.The only Les Paul I ever liked was a 53 with P90's and a wrap-a-round.something about skating barefoot,yum yum. :drool:


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: rockstar_not on June 07, 2010, 03:23:22 PM
How about a PRS type sculpted top, set neck, string through bridge - something like this Schaller http://guitar-bridge.com/hp135016/Guitar-Bridge-3D-6.htm, and choice of pup configuration like you can get on a PRS, 3 on a side head, etc.?


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: ducktrapper on June 07, 2010, 04:50:16 PM
How about a PRS type sculpted top, set neck, string through bridge - something like this Schaller http://guitar-bridge.com/hp135016/Guitar-Bridge-3D-6.htm, and choice of pup configuration like you can get on a PRS, 3 on a side head, etc.?

You could do it yourself, if'n you have the know-how or find someone to do it for you. WWLPD? What would Les Paul do?  :smile:


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: rockstar_not on June 08, 2010, 01:09:22 PM
You could do it yourself, if'n you have the know-how or find someone to do it for you. WWLPD? What would Les Paul do?  :smile:

Ah, the know-how.  Yes, and I could have built my Larry acoustic had I the know-how as well.

Since he's gone, we'll never know WWLPD.  I would like to think he would have gone away from Tune-o-matic, but that's only a dream.....


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: ducktrapper on June 08, 2010, 04:42:40 PM
Tomorrow, June 9, would have been Les Paul's 95th birthday. He would have innovated, that's what he would have done. From Wiki:

Paul was dissatisfied with acoustic-electric guitars and began experimenting at his apartment in Queens, NY with a few designs of his own. Famously, he created several versions of "The Log", which was nothing more than a length of common 4x4 lumber with a bridge, guitar neck, and pickup attached. For the sake of appearance, he attached the body of an Epiphone hollow-body guitar, sawn lengthwise with The Log in the middle. This solved his two main problems: feedback, as the acoustic body no longer resonated with the amplified sound, and sustain, as the energy of the strings was not dissipated in generating sound through the guitar body. These instruments were constantly being improved and modified over the years, and Paul continued to use them in his recordings long after the development of his eponymous Gibson model.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: rockstar_not on June 09, 2010, 03:46:04 AM
Tomorrow, June 9, would have been Les Paul's 95th birthday. He would have innovated, that's what he would have done. From Wiki:

Paul was dissatisfied with acoustic-electric guitars and began experimenting at his apartment in Queens, NY with a few designs of his own. Famously, he created several versions of "The Log", which was nothing more than a length of common 4x4 lumber with a bridge, guitar neck, and pickup attached. For the sake of appearance, he attached the body of an Epiphone hollow-body guitar, sawn lengthwise with The Log in the middle. This solved his two main problems: feedback, as the acoustic body no longer resonated with the amplified sound, and sustain, as the energy of the strings was not dissipated in generating sound through the guitar body. These instruments were constantly being improved and modified over the years, and Paul continued to use them in his recordings long after the development of his eponymous Gibson model.

Actually, I will forever be grateful to the great Les Paul; not for solid body electric guitars, but for inventing multi-track recording.


Title: Re: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?
Post by: Barefoot Rob on April 28, 2017, 10:30:21 PM
I know this is an oldie but I figured I could update it some......