Wisdom.

Started by Silence Dogood, July 15, 2023, 09:16:20 AM

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"A lie can travel around the world and back again while the truth is lacing up its boots."— Mark Twain.

Fatique is the best pillow - Ben Franklin
Larrivee Electrics - My Dream then and Now!!!!!<br /><br />Forum IV     00-03MT       #4      (Treasured)

Quote from: JOYCEfromNS on August 28, 2023, 07:24:23 PMFatique is the best pillow - Ben Franklin
Nice one.  I also like his "Hunger is the best sauce" one.  Good old Ben!

A few gems I've stumbled across of late:

"Do it or do not do it -- you will regret both."
Soren Kierkegaard

"The reason for evil in the world is that people are not able to tell their stories."
Carl Jung
(Side note: I'd like to see this one more in context to get my head more fully wrapped around it.  Jung was no lightweight so I'm sure there's a lot more to this one.  Still, it made me think all the same.)

"It is fruitless to wish you had started years ago.  In the future you will wish you had started today."
Unknown

I really enjoyed this one in particular:
"Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence."
Robert Frost

"One's destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things."

Henry Miller

"Mostly it is loss which teaches us about the worth of things."
Arthur Schopenhauer

Which reminded me of this gem from G.K. Chesterton that I go back to a lot:
"The way to love a thing is to realize it might be lost."

The fruit takes a long time to ripen, but it falls suddenly.
-ancient proverb

If the sh*t fits, wear it. - Raoul Duke (Hunter S Thompson) 

I walk around like everything is fine,
But deep down, inside my shoe,
My sock is sliding off.
-unknown

Quote from: Queequeg on September 14, 2023, 02:16:25 PMI walk around like everything is fine,
But deep down, inside my shoe,
My sock is sliding off.
-unknown

Yep. Sounds like something John Prine might say.

*** It is not my intention to start a religious discussion/debate here.

I've been spending quite a bit of time in the Old Testament Book of Ecclesiastes.  Spiritual content aside, it's just amazing how much one can learn about life in general, human nature, the smallness of man in the grand scheme, the impact and lack thereof our our choices, etc., from reading this book.  It just explains to one how life actually works. 

During my lunchtime walks I've been enjoying the KJV of this book read by a wonderful female British reader (why is everything better read by a Brit female?):  https://youtu.be/B1hd7ydxBzs?feature=shared   I thought some here might enjoy. 

I wish I'd not have had to put that disclaimer atop this response, but I know any talk of the Bible can get heated.  That's a shame because, religion aside, the Bible is one of the foundations of Western Civilization and no person (and certainly no true lover of Literature) can be considered educated without at least some knowledge and understanding of it.  Also, as a lover of books, the written word, etc., the KJV is one of the most beautiful pieces of writing the world has ever seen. 

Quote from: Silence Dogood on September 16, 2023, 07:11:53 AM*** It is not my intention to start a religious discussion/debate here.

I've been spending quite a bit of time in the Old Testament Book of Ecclesiastes.  Spiritual content aside, it's just amazing how much one can learn about life in general, human nature, the smallness of man in the grand scheme, the impact and lack thereof our our choices, etc., from reading this book.  It just explains to one how life actually works. 

During my lunchtime walks I've been enjoying the KJV of this book read by a wonderful female British reader (why is everything better read by a Brit female?):  https://youtu.be/B1hd7ydxBzs?feature=shared   I thought some here might enjoy. 

I wish I'd not have had to put that disclaimer atop this response, but I know any talk of the Bible can get heated.  That's a shame because, religion aside, the Bible is one of the foundations of Western Civilization and no person (and certainly no true lover of Literature) can be considered educated without at least some knowledge and understanding of it.  Also, as a lover of books, the written word, etc., the KJV is one of the most beautiful pieces of writing the world has ever seen. 

It's a good one. As an aside, I've often thought that Pete Seeger's Turn, Turn, Turn misses the point of the original. While he sings that there is a season for everything, he longs for there not to be a season for everything. Plus, as usual, Ol' Pete gets away with plagiarism and not having to share the dough.  :roll 


You know, that's a really interesting observation about Seeger's take on Turn, etc.  I've never seen it that way before.  I always thought it was just really beautiful how that passage was put to music.  But the more I learned about Seeger personally (and Woody Guthrie), the more their own personal philosophies made it hard for me to enjoy their art.  Of course, if they'd not seen fit to pontificate I'd have been none the wiser, but I've always disliked music as a platform for one's personal agenda.  On a more positive note though, I did admire how Seeger built his own house with his own hands and seemed to live a pretty simple life. He seemed to practice as he preached.  I never learned anything about Woody Guthrie that made me able to admire him. 

Quote from: ducktrapper on September 16, 2023, 07:45:50 AMPlus, as usual, Ol' Pete gets away with plagiarism and not having to share the dough.  :roll 
To who (or "whom") did Pete Seeger owe royalties? (I'm not cross-examining you; merely asking from the perspective of my own ignorance.)
And I know you are an avid Dylan devotee. You're very likely aware that similar claims have been made regarding RZ.
Quote from: Silence Dogood on September 16, 2023, 08:45:44 AMYou know, that's a really interesting observation about Seeger's take on Turn, etc.  I've never seen it that way before.  I always thought it was just really beautiful how that passage was put to music.  But the more I learned about Seeger personally (and Woody Guthrie), the more their own personal philosophies made it hard for me to enjoy their art.  Of course, if they'd not seen fit to pontificate I'd have been none the wiser, but I've always disliked music as a platform for one's personal agenda.  On a more positive note though, I did admire how Seeger built his own house with his own hands and seemed to live a pretty simple life. He seemed to practice as he preached.  I never learned anything about Woody Guthrie that made me able to admire him. 

Years ago I had a chance to spend some one-on-one time with Pete Seeger, I was never a big fan, for the same reason that Silence Dogood states. "always disliked music as a platform for one's personal agenda."
For this same reason, Bob Dylan's later work appealed to me more that the earlier political stuff.
And for quite some time I listen to and play mostly instrumentals.
Some sound comes so heavily laden with intention that you can't hear it for the intentions.
This is the great problem of lyrics... they always impose something that is so unmysterious.

-Brian Eno

I don't enjoy being pushed while I'm listening. I like music which lets me do my own listening.
-John Cage

Quote from: Queequeg on September 16, 2023, 09:51:24 AMTo who (or "whom") did Pete Seeger owe royalties? (I'm not cross-examining you; merely asking from the perspective of my own ignorance.)
And I know you are an avid Dylan devotee. You're very likely aware that similar claims have been made regarding RZ.Years ago I had a chance to spend some one-on-one time with Pete Seeger, I was never a big fan, for the same reason that Silence Dogood states. "always disliked music as a platform for one's personal agenda."
For this same reason, Bob Dylan's later work appealed to me more that the earlier political stuff.
And for quite some time I listen to and play mostly instrumentals.
Some sound comes so heavily laden with intention that you can't hear it for the intentions.
This is the great problem of lyrics... they always impose something that is so unmysterious.

-Brian Eno

I don't enjoy being pushed while I'm listening. I like music which lets me do my own listening.
-John Cage

In recent years I've also gotten a lot more interested in instrumental music.  The thing I began to notice is how many songs are about human misery in one form or another.  I get it: music is often an outlet for pain.  But so much of it is just dark and depressing and I don't like that in my life anymore.   Just try and look for music of excellence that is at the same time happy, uplifting, and not corny.  It's very hard to do.  As an example, I'm a big fan of the Irish family group The Corrs.  Their music is great on its own, but it's also generally pretty happy stuff. 

Quote from: Queequeg on September 16, 2023, 09:51:24 AMTo who (or "whom") did Pete Seeger owe royalties? (I'm not cross-examining you; merely asking from the perspective of my own ignorance.)
And I know you are an avid Dylan devotee. You're very likely aware that similar claims have been made regarding RZ.Years ago I had a chance to spend some one-on-one time with Pete Seeger, I was never a big fan, for the same reason that Silence Dogood states. "always disliked music as a platform for one's personal agenda."
For this same reason, Bob Dylan's later work appealed to me more that the earlier political stuff.
And for quite some time I listen to and play mostly instrumentals.
Some sound comes so heavily laden with intention that you can't hear it for the intentions.
This is the great problem of lyrics... they always impose something that is so unmysterious.

-Brian Eno

I don't enjoy being pushed while I'm listening. I like music which lets me do my own listening.
-John Cage


The Lion Sleeps Tonight was taken from Mbube written and recorded by Solomon Lindo who never saw a dime from the millions in royalties his song made for others including Seeger and The Weavers. Like the cut the cord incident at Newport, Seeger has obfuscated or claimed ignorance over whether he knew this or that he sent Lindo some cash or instructed his royalties go to him or his estate. And of course, the author(s) of Ecclesiastes only got credit.
Like you, I'm not a big fan of overtly political songs, at least not partisan ones, and prefer the electric Dylan for the most part. I saw Billy Bragg at The Winnipeg Folk Festival in 2006 or so. He spent most of his gig on the main stage ranting about George Bush. A Brit lecturing Canadians about an American politician. What a waste of time and breath. I yelled out, "Put it in a song!" and was almost attacked by a hippy. Strange days indeed. Oh and he was terrible when he did play a song so maybe it's better he ranted.  :yak:     

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lion_Sleeps_Tonight

Quote from: ducktrapper on September 16, 2023, 10:12:52 AMThe Lion Sleeps Tonight was taken from Mbube written and recorded by Solomon Lindo who never saw a dime from the millions in royalties his song made for others including Seeger and The Weavers. Like the cut the cord incident at Newport, Seeger has obfuscated or claimed ignorance over whether he knew this or that he sent Lindo some cash or instructed his royalties go to him or his estate. And of course, the author(s) of Ecclesiastes only got credit.
Like you, I'm not a big fan of overtly political songs, at least not partisan ones, and prefer the electric Dylan for the most part. I saw Billy Bragg at The Winnipeg Folk Festival in 2006 or so. He spent most of his gig on the main stage ranting about George Bush. A Brit lecturing Canadians about an American politician. What a waste of time and breath. I yelled out, "Put it in a song!" and was almost attacked by a hippy. Strange days indeed. Oh and he was terrible when he did play a song so maybe it's better he ranted.  :yak:     

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lion_Sleeps_Tonight
I have never been one to connect with protest/political songs (even when I agree with the message).  Most of the time they will only ever pigeon-hole the artist.  There is one that recently blew up called "Rich Men North of Richmond" by a young dude called Oliver Anthony.  It will be very hard for him to ever be seen as a legit musician rather than the guy who song that one song about rich guys. 

For a time I was into the band Wilco, and they did an album with Billy Bragg of Woody Guthrie songs.  I picked up a copy at my local library and checked it out.  I have to admit that "California Stars" was a really good track, but the rest of it, for me, was very unmemorable.  I think Bragg even paints things on his guitar like Woody Guthrie did.   
 :?

Side note and observation: 
This will be worth about what you paid for it, but here is my take on people who protest and rant about things.  The main thing about these people is that they are angry, and angry people can never really be satisfied or helped.  Even if the things they are protesting about were to be solved in the way they claim that they want them solved, it wouldn't be enough, because the thing they really enjoy is being angry and upset.  If the thing got solved, they would lose their identity and their raison d'etre.  They'd soon be bored to tears and would then have to get upset about something else.  That's why I think protest songs, by in large, are disingenuous and are usually just a reason for angry people to rant. 

Reminds me of the bit from James Allen: "Men are anxious to improve their circumstances, but are unwilling to improve themselves."

"Sit loosely in the saddle of life."  - Robert Louis Stevenson
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Quote from: Silence Dogood on September 17, 2023, 05:51:04 AMReminds me of the bit from James Allen: "Men are anxious to improve their circumstances, but are unwilling to improve themselves."

Exactly what Jordan Peterson talks about. When young people rant about changing the world, he asks them if they made their bed this morning. Very Zen.

Quote from: ducktrapper on September 17, 2023, 07:44:08 AMExactly what Jordan Peterson talks about. When you young people rant about changing the world, he asks them if they made their bed this morning. Very Zen.
Count me in as a big fan of Peterson.  He has taught me a lot.  And all the right people hate him. 
 :wave

"Wisdom is a shelter, as money is a shelter. But the advantage of knowledge is this: that wisdom preserves the life of its possessor." King Solomon

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Quote from: ducktrapper on September 16, 2023, 10:12:52 AMAnd of course, the author(s) of Ecclesiastes only got credit.
Ecclesiastes was written by King Solomon, or so I am led to believe. I'm not a biblical scholar, myself, but I might have thought that the Good King's copyright protection would have expired by now and the passage in question (along with all the rest of it) would have entered the realm of the Public Domain.
But I suppose Kings can write whatever copyright laws they wish extending to the end of time, till a' the seas gang dry, and the rocks melt wi' the sun: if they so choose.
If I had more time (or interest) I'd scour the records to see if King James ever paid royalties to Solomon or the other original biblical authors. But lacking both, I will go out on a limb now and assume that James didn't bother with any of that at all.
Kings can get away with all of that kind of thing, you know. I suspect he had a ghost writer anyway; the archbishop of Canterbury perhaps? And King James stole all the credit from him too; the scoundrel!

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